horseshoe crab

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horseshoe crab

(hŏrs′shoo″, hŏrsh′oo krăb)
Limulus polyphemus, a species of saltwater arthropod that is a member of the Chelicerates, the subphylum containing scorpions and spiders, rather than the Crustaceans, the subphylum containing true crabs. The Limulus body structure has remained nearly unchanged for 450 million years, longer than almost any other living animal. Its blood is blue rather than red because oxygen is carried by a copper-based compound rather than hemoglobin, which is an iron-based compound; Limulus blood is used in testing drugs for bacterial contamination.
References in periodicals archive ?
With the exception of a study by Rudloe (1983) on the mortality rates of bled animals and a study by James-Pirri et al (2012) on the impacts of bleeding on horseshoe crab orientation, all relevant studies regarding biomedical bleeding effects on horseshoe crabs have been carried out in the laboratory.
No significant differences (Chi-square test, P > 0.05) were found in the survival rates of both horseshoe crabs in the different treatments, although low survival rates were observed in high FM replacement treatments.
The fossil of the now extinct animal was found in in Idaho by paleontologists who just published ascientific articledescribing the extinct horseshoe crab.
For genomic sequencing, an individual horseshoe crab was wild-caught from Great Bay Estuary in Durham, NH (43[degrees]05'30"N and 70[degrees]51'55"W).
Though formidable looking, horseshoe crabs are actually quite harmless.
In 2010, a similar population study was done of 75 horseshoe crabs in Chatham waters with a $50,000 federal grant.
Medical scientists use horseshoe crab blood to make sure drugs, vaccines and medical equipment are bacteria free.
In the New Zealand rainforests, he examines the elusive velvet worm as well as the reptilian tuatara; he searches for a ferreret (a Mallorcan midwife toad) in the Sierra de Tramontana in Mallorca and watches as the hardy horseshoe crab scrambles to mate in Delaware Bay.
Looking more closely, she saw something she'd never seen there: dozens of juvenile horseshoe crabs swimming in the tidal creek.
Horseshoe crabs are harvested primarily for use as bait and secondarily
Murphy Prosomal-width-to-weight relationships in American horseshoe crabs (Limulus polyphemus): examining conversion factors used to estimate landings
Extraordinary images, at the start, of iguanas, horseshoe crabs and turtles provide only a taste of what's to come, as the cameras glide in balletic fashion with creatures as fantastic as anything created by CG.