Horner's syndrome


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Horner's syndrome

The association, on one side, of a drooping upper eyelid, an apparently slightly sunken eyeball, a pupil reduced in size compared with the other, and absence of sweating on the same side of the face. This syndrome is an indication that certain nerves in the neck have been damaged, possibly by cancer. (Johann Friedrich Horner, 1831–1886, Swiss ophthalmologist)
References in periodicals archive ?
Adult Horner's syndrome: A combined clinical, pharmacological, and imaging algorithm.
Horner's syndrome in an African spotted eagle owl (Bubo africanus).
Horner's syndrome (also called oculosympathetic paresis) typically consists of miosis, ptosis, and hemifacial anhidrosis and is a well-described neurological syndrome that is useful clinically for neurological localization.
Patel et al., "Clinical case seminar: Riedel's thyroiditis: report of a case complicated by spontaneous hypoparathyroidism, recurrent laryngeal nerve injury, and Horner's syndrome," The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism, vol.
Ross, "Eye on children: Acute work-up for pediatric horner's syndrome. case presentation and review of the literature," Journal of Emergency Medicine, vol.
Though the diagnosis of Horner's syndrome is rare in pediatric patients, potential serious underlying etiologies raise concern.
Sympathetic innervation disorders may cause Horner's syndrome (Monteiro and Coppeto, 1988; Singh et al., 2004; Zafeiriou et al., 2006) as well as they are suppressed secretion of melatonin which is necessary for photo- periodcial stimulus of the reproduction function and synthesized from the pineal gland (Karasek et al., 2002; Maurel et al., 2002).
were observed in this study, except one patient (4%) in Group-C had Horner's syndrome. 20% in Group-C and 12% in Group-L had post-operative nausea and vomiting (P>0.05, not statistically significant, Table-7).
Congenital Horner's syndrome resulting from agenesis of the internal carotid artery.
Oculosympathetic palsy or Horner's syndrome is the triad of meiosis, ptosis, and anhidrosis that results from disruption of the sympathetic pathways between the brain and the eye.
Hemiplegia Vegetativa Alterna (HVA) is the clinical condition characterized with ipsilateral Horner's syndrome (HS) and contralateral hemi-hyperhidrosis and is mainly used to define the condition at stroke patients with posterior cerebral artery (PCA) or middle cerebral artery (MCA) occlusion (1,2).
A thorough examination of the upper limb may require examination of the eyes (to exclude Horner's syndrome), an assessment of neck movement, a vascular assessment, breast and axilla palpation and a neurological assessment of the lower limbs.