Hormodendrum

Hormodendrum

An obsolete genus name for the fungi once thought to cause chromomycosis, which are now recognised to have been laboratory contaminants.
References in periodicals archive ?
Similarly, after a 1970 tornado in Texas, United States, fungi were identified in 8 (6.5%) of 124 wound isolates from 24 hospitalized patients (Fusarium, unspecified yeast, Rhodotorula, Aspergillus, Hormodendrum [now Cladosporium], and Cephalosporium), and in 4 (10.5%) of 38 wound isolates from 23 ambulatory patients (28).
These included Alternaria tenuis, Aspergillus humicola, Aspergillus niger, Chaetomella horrid, Chaetomium globosum, Hormodendrum viride, and Penicillium corylophilum [11].
farinae), cat, dog, feather, insect mix (American and German cockroaches and fire ants), mosquito (Aedes taeniorhynchus), mixed grass (Bermuda, Johnson, Bahia, Salt, and Rye), tree (mix 1: Mulberry, Elm, Acacia, Cypress; mix 2: box elder, beefwood, bayberry, oak, palm, melaleuca, hackberry, sweet gum, and maple), interior and exterior mold (Rhizopus, Mucor, Pullularia, Penicillum, Aspergillus, Curvularia, Fusarium, Alternaria, Hormodendrum, Helmintospororium), and weed (mix 1: English Plantain, Pigweed, Ragweed; mix 2: marsh elder, cocklebur, lamb quarter); in addition, a histamine skin test was performed and a diluent control was included for each series.
Patients were also tested for allergy to standardized cat hair, dog epithelium, and three common molds (Hormodendrum, Aspergillus fumigatus, and Alternaria tenuis).
In general, Alternaria and Cladosporium (Hormodendrum) are the molds most commonly found both indoors and outdoors throughout the United States.