honorific

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honorific

[L. honorificus, honor-making]
To convey honor upon a person, esp. while writing or speaking about an individual.
See: pejorative
References in periodicals archive ?
and Korean cultures both have a politeness system of socially appropriate titles for address, but Korean culture places more emphasis on using specific honorifics in social interactions (Yoon, 2004).
Both Korean and American individuals with stronger inclinations to protect their own negative face needs are more likely to confront the other party, and this tendency is stronger in the broken social promise situation than in the honorifics use situation.
We have already seen some uncontroversial examples of expressions which lack descriptive content, and honorifics may be a class of words which are semantically similar to slurs.
In his recent paper on the abang honorific (denoting royal blood for men) among Sarawak and Sadong Malays, Bob Reece (n.
2) I reproduce these here, as von Gaffron reported them, with the original Dutch spelling and reference to the abang honorific highlighted.
Matsumoto (1988: 415) presents an example to illustrate the interplay of face, politeness, and honorifics for the case of Japanese, though Matsumoto's explanation actually centers on deference, not politeness or face.
IN A clear departure from tradition, President Pranab Mukherjee wants none of the colonial honorifics to be associated with his name or post.
The remaining 20 chapters examine sociolinguistic innovations; cultural terms and figurative expressions; linguistic etiquette, such as honorifics, address and reference terms, and politeness in conversation; Korean in the media; and linguistic features in Korean.
To these honorifics were soon added others like calling Saint Jerome, Vir Trilinguis ("Man of Three Languages"--i.
While real jobs are generally doled out one-per-customer, nonprofit board seats are coveted honorifics snapped up by the half dozen.
He does this by presenting portraits of a number of valorous soldiers who might have received honorifics but did not in Iraq and Afghanistan, each chapter opening with their place of origin, military position, and any awards received.
If a child addresses an adult with an honorific, we must be careful not to correct them with, `Call me by my first name,' as they are obeying the request of a parent or caregiver.