homoscedasticity

(redirected from Homoskedasticity)
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ho·mo·sced·as·tic·i·ty

(hō'mō-skĕd-as-tis'ĭ-tē),
Constancy of the variance of a measure over the levels of the factor under study.

homoscedasticity

characterized by variances which do not differ greatly between distributions.
References in periodicals archive ?
The homoskedasticity assumption is lifted by considering different weighting matrices.
The results confirmed all of the normality of residuals assumptions, homoskedasticity, serial autocorrelation, and multicollinearity.
it] denotes that homoskedasticity is assumed and not correlated over time [[alpha].
5118 respectively which indicated the acceptance of null hypothesis at 5 percent level of significance and favoured Homoskedasticity.
Equation (4) is estimated by maximum likelihood method and the procedure does not require assumption of normality or homoskedasticity of error in predictor variables.
0000 Source: calculations of the research Table 5: test on variance isotropy White's test for Ho: homoskedasticity against Ha: unrestricted heteroskedasticity chi2(27) = 85.
2013), we implement the modified Wald test for group wise for testing the hypotheses of homoskedasticity.
The main consequence of this structure in the error term is the breakdown of the homoskedasticity assumption of the estimation.
Table 4 reports the results of the White test, where the null is homoskedasticity.
Pagan-Hall General test and Pagan-Hall Test w/assumed Normality statistics show reveal homoskedasticity.
In order to establish distribution of the idiosyncratic components, the authors made the assumption of homoskedasticity across time periods--pointed out in Bai and Ng [2002] to be undesirable--and that [e.
These include the Lagrange-multiplier statistic for 1st and 2nd order autocorrelation testing the null hypothesis of no serial correlation; the ARCH test of Engle (1982) testing the null of autoregressive conditional homoskedasticity; the normality test of Doornik and Hansen (1994) testing the null of normal errors after applying a small-sample correction; and the heteroskedasticity test of White (1980) testing the null of unconditional homoskedasticity.