warm-blooded

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Related to Homoeothermic: homeothermic

ho·me·o·ther·mic

(hō'mē-ō-ther'mik),
Pertaining to, or having the essential characteristic of, homeotherms. Compare: poikilothermic, heterothermic.

warm-blooded

also

warmblooded

(wôrm′blŭd′ĭd)
adj.
Zoology Maintaining a relatively constant and warm body temperature independent of environmental temperature; homeothermic.

warm′-blood′ed·ness, warm′blood′ed·ness n.

warm-blooded

Etymology: AS, wearm + blod
having a relatively high and constant body temperature, such as the temperatures maintained by humans, other mammals, and birds, despite changes in environmental temperatures. Heat is produced in the warm-blooded human body by the catabolism of foods in proportion to the amount of work performed by the tissues in the body. Heat is lost from the body by evaporation, radiation, conduction, and convection. About 80% of the body heat that is dissipated in humans is lost through the skin. The rest is lost through the mucous membranes of the respiratory, the digestive, and the urinary systems. The average temperature of the healthy human is 98.6° F (37° C). Also called homoiothermal, homothermal. Compare cold-blooded.
References in periodicals archive ?
The data in Table 6 suggest that the excretion rate decreases as trophic level increases, although this trend may be offset because mammals are homoeothermic, with concomitantly higher metabolic rates (for a stated mass).
The need to make the best use of this radiation during the day is the explanation for the differences in pigmentation between homoeothermic (warm-blooded) animals and poikilothermic (cold-blooded) ones in the mountains.
The international literature is extensive in the checks on the environmental factors that impose some stress to ruminants, and the performance is the result of the homoeothermic functioning, among other factors, and a dysfunction in this system leads to significant changes in the efficiency of production (NUNES et al.
Domestic fowl being homoeothermic can live comfortably only in a relatively narrow zone of thermo-neutrality ranging from 14.