holdfast

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holdfast

(hōld′făst′)
n.
1. Any of various devices used to fasten something securely.
2. Biology An organ or structure of attachment, especially the basal, rootlike formation by which certain seaweeds or other algae are attached to a substrate.

holdfast

the basal part of the stripe (stalk) of large seaweeds such as Fucus , Laminaria, attaching the plant to the substrate.
References in periodicals archive ?
The fronds contained more lipids than the stipes, holdfast, or the whole plant, particularly in fall (Table 1).
Furthermore, crude fiber levels in whole plants, stipes, and holdfast were greater in Talquilla, whereas levels were higher in fronds from Lagunillas.
After the seahorse selected the holdfast inside the territory, the damselfish was reintroduced.
Seahorse color and its holdfast color were also recorded.
Morphological traits of each experimental kelp were quantified by weighing its fronds and holdfast, recording the number and lengths of its fronds, and using one of two simple techniques to determine its maximal projected area (i.e., the maximal area that could face flow if the kelp was configured in its least streamlined posture).
If the vine climbs by holdfasts and total wall coverage is the only objective, little attention is needed except the removal of dead or damaged shoots, and those extending too far outward from the wall.
Second, all fronds regenerated from holdfasts and, hence, were of small to moderate size.
The macrofaunal community of Ecklonia radiata holdfasts: description of the faunal assemblage and variation associated with differences in holdfast volume.
The latter is more important because it is the individual stipes of the thalli that typically break, not the holdfasts (which can be shared by multiple thalli).
At the end of the study, the majority of the specimens had a holdfasts 6 cm in diameter, 3 m in length and a biomass of 2.7 kg; with a maximum of 7 kg wet weight per specimen (Figs.