psychiatry

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psychiatry

 [si-ki´ah-tre]
the branch of health science that deals with the study, treatment, and prevention of mental disorders. adj., adj psychiat´ric.
biological psychiatry that which emphasizes biochemical, pharmacological, and neurological causes and treatment approaches.
community psychiatry the branch of psychiatry concerned with the detection, prevention, and treatment of mental disorders in a designated geographical area, with emphasis on environmental factors.
descriptive psychiatry psychiatry based on the study of observable symptoms and behavioral phenomena, rather than underlying psychodynamic processes.
dynamic psychiatry psychiatry based on the study of the mental mechanisms and emotional processes that govern and motivate human behavior, rather than observable behavioral phenomena.
forensic psychiatry that dealing with the legal aspects of mental disorders.
geriatric psychiatry geropsychiatry.
preventive psychiatry a broad term referring to the amelioration, control, and limitation of psychiatric disability.
social psychiatry that concerned with the cultural and social factors that engender, precipitate, intensify, or prolong maladaptive patterns of behavior and complicate treatment.

psy·chi·a·try

(sī-kī'ă-trē),
1. The medical specialty concerned with the diagnosis and treatment of mental disorders.
2. For some types of psychiatry not listed below, see also subentries under therapy, psychotherapy, psychoanalysis.
Synonym(s): psychiatrics
[psych- + G. iatreia, medical treatment]

psychiatry

/psy·chi·a·try/ (si-ki´ah-tre) the branch of medicine dealing with the study, treatment, and prevention of mental disorders.psychiat´ric
biological psychiatry  that which emphasizes physical, chemical, and neurological causes and treatment approaches.
community psychiatry  that concerned with the detection, prevention, and treatment of mental disorders as they develop within designated psychosocial, cultural, or geographical areas.
descriptive psychiatry  that based on the study of observable symptoms and behavioral phenomena, rather than underlying psychodynamic processes.
dynamic psychiatry  that based on the study of emotional processes, their origins, and the mental mechanisms underlying them, rather than observable behavioral phenomena.
forensic psychiatry  that dealing with the legal aspects of mental disorders.
geriatric psychiatry  geropsychiatry.
preventive psychiatry  that broadly concerned with the amelioration, control, and limitation of psychiatric disability.
social psychiatry  that concerned with the cultural and social factors that engender, precipitate, intensify, or prolong maladaptive patterns of behavior and complicate treatment.

psychiatry

(sĭ-kī′ə-trē, sī-)
n.
The branch of medicine that deals with the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of mental and emotional disorders.

psy′chi·at′ric (sī′kē-ăt′rĭk), psy′chi·at′ri·cal (-rĭ-kəl) adj.
psy′chi·at′ri·cal·ly adv.

psychiatry

[sīkī′ətrē]
Etymology: Gk, psyche + iatreia, treatment
the branch of medical science that deals with the causes, treatment, and prevention of mental, emotional, and behavioral disorders. Some kinds of psychiatry are community psychiatry, descriptive psychiatry, dynamic psychiatry, existential psychiatry, forensic psychiatry, and orthopsychiatry. psychiatric, adj.

psychiatry

The medical specialty concerned with physical and chemical interactions in the brain and how they affect mental and emotional processes; the study, treatment, and prevention of mental illness. See Consultation-liaison psychiatry, Forensic psychiatry, Geriatric psychiatry, Neuropsychiatry, Orthomolecular psychiatry, Orthopsychiatry.

psy·chi·a·try

(sī-kī'ă-trē)
The medical specialty concerned with the diagnosis and treatment of mental disorders.
[psych- + G. iatreia, medical treatment]

psychiatry

The branch of medicine concerned with the management of mental illness and emotional and behavioural problems. Compare PSYCHOLOGY.

psychiatry (sīˈ·kīˑ··trē),

n the modern medical specialty that focuses on understanding; diagnosing; and treating emotional, mental, and behavioral dysfunctions or disorders.

psy·chi·a·try

, psychiatrics (sī-kī'ă-trē, sīkē-atriks)
Medical specialty concerned with diagnosis and treatment of mental disorders.
[psych- + G. iatreia, medical treatment]

psychiatry,

n the branch of medical science that deals with the causes, treatment, and prevention of mental, emotional, and behavioral disorders.
References in periodicals archive ?
As ever in the history of psychiatry, some new now-we've-really- got-it cure came along in time to replace one whose flaws were getting too hard to hide.
His last victim is doomed to die unless the least likely and sexiest shrink in the history of psychiatry (Jennifer Lopez, above) can enter his mind.
Although I offer no new information concerning the collaboration between Bleuler and Freud, the inference I draw concerning its impact on the history of psychiatry is, I believe, novel.
In response to the common refrain that we know about and do recovery already, the authors set the recovery movement within the conceptual framework of major thinkers and achievers in the history of psychiatry, such as Philippe Pinel, Dorothea Dix, Adolf Meyer, Harry Stack Sullivan, and Franco Basaglia.
Guislain was founded in 1986 in Ghent, Belgium, and its exhibits address the history of psychiatry in a permanent collection and through a series of half-yearly changing thematic exhibitions.
Guislain Museum tells the history of psychiatry through its permanent and temporary exhibitions.
For readers familiar with the history of psychiatry, Ablard's chapters cover common territory, including debates over the rise of the asylum, the role that families played in negotiating committals and discharges, a proliferation of somatic therapies that grew out of an increased focus on neurology, the rise of "modern" psychopharmacological therapies, legal debates over responsibility and dangerousness, and eventually the rise of community-based treatment clinics.

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