euthanasia

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euthanasia

 [u″thah-na´zhah]
1. an easy or painless death.
2. the deliberate ending of life of a person suffering from an incurable disease. In recent years the concept has been broadened to include the practice of withholding extraordinary means or “heroic measures,” and thus allowing the patient to die (see extraordinary treatment). A distinction was traditionally made between positive or active euthanasia, in which there is the deliberate ending of life and an action is taken to cause death in a person, and negative or passive euthanasia, which is the withholding of life-preserving procedures and treatments that would prolong the life of one who is incurably and terminally ill and could not survive without them. However, now all euthanasia is generally understood to be active, and so the more accurate term forgoing life-sustaining treatment is replacing passive euthanasia. See also advance directives.
voluntary euthanasia see assisted suicide.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

eu·tha·na·si·a

(yū-thă-nā'zē-ă),
1. A quiet, painless death.
2. The intentional putting to death of a person with an incurable or painful disease intended as an act of mercy.
[eu- + G. thanatos, death]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

euthanasia

(yo͞o′thə-nā′zhə, -zhē-ə)
n.
The act or practice of ending the life of a person or animal having a terminal illness or a medical condition that causes suffering perceived as incompatible with an acceptable quality of life, as by lethal injection or the suspension of certain medical treatments.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
The induction of death, or painlessly putting to death a patient suffering from an incurable disease; deliberate administration of medications—e.g., narcotics or barbiturates—to a terminally ill patient at his/her own request, to end life
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

euthanasia

Medical ethics The induction of death, or painlessly putting to death, a Pt suffering from an incurable disease; deliberate administration of medications–eg narcotics or barbiturates to an terminally ill Pt at the Pt's own request, to end his/her life. See Advance directive, DNR, Initiative 119, Kevorkian, Physician-assisted suicide, Slow code, Social euthanasia.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

eu·tha·na·si·a

(yū'thă-nā'zē-ă)
1. The intentional putting to death of a person with an incurable or painful disease, intended as an act of mercy.
2. A quiet, painless death.
Synonym(s): man-made death (1) .
[eu- + G. thanatos, death]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

euthanasia

Mercy killing.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

euthanasia

the act of painless killing to relieve human suffering from an incurable disease.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

Euthanasia

The act of putting a person or animal to death painlessly or allowing them to die by withholding medical services, usually because of a painful and incurable disease. Mercy killing is another term for euthanasia.
Mentioned in: Bereavement, Suicide
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

eu·tha·na·si·a

(yū'thă-nā'zē-ă)
1. A quiet, painless death.
2. The intentional putting to death of a person with an incurable or painful disease intended as an act of mercy.
[eu- + G. thanatos, death]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Dworkin's methodological recommendation seems to me to be roughly correct in its account of what American judges do and ought to do in cases in which no relatively determinate, widely practiced, tacit norm of adjudication dictates the relative significance of competing historical considerations. (283) In such cases, a judge has no choice but to exercise judgment, and the requisite judgment has an irreducibly normative dimension.
This is more extreme, possibly more extreme than Levenson himself can really mean, for the logic of it would seem to demand the total exclusion of all historical considerations from religion.
Surveying the works of Elizabeth Blower, Francis Coventry, and Charlotte Lennox, for instance, in order to clarify the tonal distinctiveness of Austen, he breaks off to ask: 'Does not this knowledge seem to contradict my general contention that external, specialised, knowledge need not be possessed by a good reader of Jane Austen?', and concludes that 'external literary historical considerations' are redundant since the meaning of the passage he has been analysing is discoverable in the 'tone and structure of the argument itself and its place in the novel' (pp.
This view has now been largely discredited, and contemporary scholars are increasingly inclined to regard these works as much closer to the modern conception of a historical novel, in which characters and situations may be real or imaginary but in which artistic rather than historical considerations are paramount.
Because the tradition of the roman antique is founded in literary practice it is possible to observe its effects on a whole range of philosophical, literary, and historical considerations, rather more clearly than in Hagstrum, where the simply empirical experience of human love was allowed to compensate for the somewhat more complicated interaction of cultural transmission and literary tradition.
In a careful reading of this exceptionally dense text, Eakin argues that James's "hurt" is every bit as obscure as the author says it was, implicating complex psychological and historical considerations. He concludes that Leon Edel's "well-intentioned attempt to demystify the hurt" in his biography of James is ultimately wrongheaded: "a back injury of 1862 simply will not do as the objective correlative for the psychological confusion young Henry James experienced at the beginning of the war in 1861" (69).
What this means, Ameriks writes, is "stressing that historical considerations are a crucial part of the effective presentation of at least some arguments central to philosophy as a developing systematic discipline" (6).
Historical considerations are holding Newcastle back in its battle to become the retail capital of the North.
However, even if one were willing to put aside the traditional source criticism of the Pentateuch and the notion of a Deuteronomistic History, still, too many other historical considerations prevent my accepting W.'s thesis.
The first is a systematic discussion of largely historical considerations pertaining to live and recorded performance of Bach.
Yet historical considerations can be indispensable.
The Committee also rejected the reverse auction system for managing quotas on the basis of the order in which customs declarations are submitted rather that distribution of licences according to historical considerations. The European Commission was forced in April 1999 to modify the Community banana regime, following a decision by the WTO condemning as discriminatory the regime in place and ordering the EU to reform arrangements by January 1, 2000.

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