euthanasia

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euthanasia

 [u″thah-na´zhah]
1. an easy or painless death.
2. the deliberate ending of life of a person suffering from an incurable disease. In recent years the concept has been broadened to include the practice of withholding extraordinary means or “heroic measures,” and thus allowing the patient to die (see extraordinary treatment). A distinction was traditionally made between positive or active euthanasia, in which there is the deliberate ending of life and an action is taken to cause death in a person, and negative or passive euthanasia, which is the withholding of life-preserving procedures and treatments that would prolong the life of one who is incurably and terminally ill and could not survive without them. However, now all euthanasia is generally understood to be active, and so the more accurate term forgoing life-sustaining treatment is replacing passive euthanasia. See also advance directives.
voluntary euthanasia see assisted suicide.

eu·tha·na·si·a

(yū-thă-nā'zē-ă),
1. A quiet, painless death.
2. The intentional putting to death of a person with an incurable or painful disease intended as an act of mercy.
[eu- + G. thanatos, death]

euthanasia

/eu·tha·na·sia/ (u″thah-na´zhah)
1. an easy or painless death.
2. mercy killing; the deliberate ending of life of a person suffering from an incurable disease.

euthanasia

(yo͞o′thə-nā′zhə, -zhē-ə)
n.
The act or practice of ending the life of a person or animal having a terminal illness or a medical condition that causes suffering perceived as incompatible with an acceptable quality of life, as by lethal injection or the suspension of certain medical treatments.

euthanasia

[yo̅o̅′thənā′zhə]
Etymology: Gk, eu, good; thanatos, death
1 also called mercy killing. the deliberate causing of the death of a person who is suffering from an incurable disease or condition. It may be active, such as by administration of a lethal drug, or passive, such as by withholding of treatment. Legal authorities, church leaders, philosophers, and commentators on ethics and morality usually distinguish passive euthanasia from active euthanasia.
2 an easy, quiet, painless death.
The induction of death, or painlessly putting to death a patient suffering from an incurable disease; deliberate administration of medications—e.g., narcotics or barbiturates—to a terminally ill patient at his/her own request, to end life

euthanasia

Medical ethics The induction of death, or painlessly putting to death, a Pt suffering from an incurable disease; deliberate administration of medications–eg narcotics or barbiturates to an terminally ill Pt at the Pt's own request, to end his/her life. See Advance directive, DNR, Initiative 119, Kevorkian, Physician-assisted suicide, Slow code, Social euthanasia.

eu·tha·na·si·a

(yū'thă-nā'zē-ă)
1. The intentional putting to death of a person with an incurable or painful disease, intended as an act of mercy.
2. A quiet, painless death.
Synonym(s): man-made death (1) .
[eu- + G. thanatos, death]

euthanasia

Mercy killing.

euthanasia

the act of painless killing to relieve human suffering from an incurable disease.

Euthanasia

The act of putting a person or animal to death painlessly or allowing them to die by withholding medical services, usually because of a painful and incurable disease. Mercy killing is another term for euthanasia.
Mentioned in: Bereavement, Suicide

euthanasia (yōō·th·nāˑ·zh),

n the act of facilitating death in a terminally ill patient, whether by deliberate activity, such as the administration of drugs that hasten death (known as
active euthanasia), or passive, as in the withholding of life-extending treatment
(passive euthanasia).

eu·tha·na·si·a

(yū'thă-nā'zē-ă)
1. A quiet, painless death.
2. The intentional putting to death of a person with an incurable or painful disease intended as an act of mercy.
[eu- + G. thanatos, death]

euthanasia

1. an easy or painless death.
2. the deliberate ending of life of an animal suffering from an incurable disease; called also mercy killing, to put down, to put to sleep.
For the individual animal intravenous injection of a massive dose of barbiturate is best. Any narcotizing drug creates difficulties if the carcass is to be disposed of for pet meat. In those cases shooting with a bullet or captive bolt pistol is recommended because of the speed of the despatch. For large numbers of animals at a pound or shelter, injection procedures are still superior to the bulk methods which all have the fallibility of poorly managed and supervised machinery. Carbon monoxide is very fast but dangerous to the operators of the cabinet. Electrocution cannot be performed en masse and gassing with carbon monoxide or lowering of the atmospheric pressure are not really quick enough. Small laboratory animals are still despatched by a sharp blow to the head and birds by guillotine or separation of the cervical vertebrae.

electrical euthanasia
uses mains electrical current passed through the subject's body via clips applied to the skin of the ear and the tail. Not much employed because of danger to human operators, likelihood of equipment failure and need for close contact with device.
References in periodicals archive ?
In particular, some Justices, echoed by more law professors, sometimes complain that courts have no legally legitimate authority to deviate from the Constitution's T1 meaning, even when other historical considerations would indicate that they ought to do so.
Dworkin's methodological recommendation seems to me to be roughly correct in its account of what American judges do and ought to do in cases in which no relatively determinate, widely practiced, tacit norm of adjudication dictates the relative significance of competing historical considerations.
Once the criterion of "fit" is accepted, any theory that denies the occasional relevance to constitutional adjudication of a broad range of historical considerations, and disallows the need for normative judgment in determining how to weigh them in particular cases, fares extremely poorly.
At this point, however, we are still left with a question that includes both empirical and normative elements: Which kinds of historical considerations do and should matter, and how much should they matter, under which circumstances?
When judges and lawyers explain why a particular result is the right one in a case in which different historical considerations point in different directions, they often offer generalized methodological explanations--involving, for example, the significance of the original public meaning of constitutional language or the applicability or nonapplicability of the "policy" of stare decisis.
If so, an authorization of case-by-case judicial judgment in appraising sometimes competing historical considerations would threaten pervasively unpredictable or ideologically driven constitutional decisions.
Second, implicit norms and conventions of legal practice will frequently produce convergent conclusions among judges and lawyers about which historical considerations matter most in particular cases.
In these historical considerations, the authors emphasize the constitutive elements of the Liturgy of the Hours, particularly the Psalms.
As the title of the book indicates, this commentary intentionally eschews philological and historical considerations, and concentrates mainly on extracting and explaining Aristotle's arguments from the text.
He covers an overture to his thought; interpretation, being, and truth; some historical considerations on whether a Nietzschean can speak to theology; postmodernism and theology; and truth and interpretation.
Although historical considerations are paramount, the book is essentially pastoral: it presumes that a fuller knowledge of the Pauline tradition will enhance readers' understanding of their own Christian lives.
s volume will prove to be a helpful reference work for historical considerations of a theology of tradition while at the same time making a significant contribution to contemporary theological discussion of the topic.

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