Hispanic

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adjective Referring to any of 17 major Latino subcultures, concentrated in California, Texas, Chicago, Miami, NYC and elsewhere
noun A person of Mexican, Puerto Rican, Cuban, Central or South American, or other Spanish culture or origin, regardless of race

Hispanic

Multiculture A person of Mexican, Puerto Rican, Cuban, Central or South American, or other Spanish culture or origin, regardless of race Social medicine Any of 17 major Latino subcultures, concentrated in California, Texas, Chicago, Miam, NY, and elsewhere
References in periodicals archive ?
The Web site, sponsored by several pharmaceutical companies, offers Spanish translations of information about the top eight cancers most frequently diagnosed in Hispanic people living in the United States.
Many financial services companies, for example, have let false, negative stereotypes--that Hispanic people don't have money, that they don't save, that they don't invest and can't buy homes--affect their marketing decisions.
Three Kings Day (Dia de los Reyes), is celebrated by Hispanic people 12 days after Christmas and commemorates the visit of the Three Kings (Melchior, Balthazar, and Caspar) to the stable in Bethlehem.
This could deny young people a law career or opportunities in other parts of Spain and isolate Hispanic people in the Americas from where so much culture, literature and commerce emanates.
Hopefully Hispanic people will be encouraged to learn English when they see their employers learning to speak Spanish, Burdick said.
Few things poison race relations in America today more than the differential sentencing of white and black or Hispanic people who commit essentially the same crimes.
And [I want to] make the Evanston community see that we have Hispanic people with an education--that we are not only the people who cut the grass, or the people who clean the tables in the restaurants.
Bringing scientists and community members together for research and intervention is a novel approach in the world of population-based biomedical research--research that is based on defining a certain population, such as children, Hispanic people, or residents of a particular town.
Between 1990 and 1994 the number of Hispanic people in the United States grew from a bout 21 million to 27 million, a 28 percent growth rate compared with a 6 percent growth rate for the total U.
Minorities are affected disproportionately by TB: 54 percent of active TB cases in 1995 were among African-American and Hispanic people, with an additional 17.
Compared with white people in each region, black and Hispanic people more often reported fair or poor health, especially those in the Northeast and Southeast.

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