hindsight

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hindsight

The ability to look backwards in time and feel comfortable with one's ability to predict an event that has occurred even if one may have predicted the outcome differently before the event.
References in periodicals archive ?
Kaminetzky, Leveraged Buyout Bankruptcies, the Problem of Hindsight Bias, and the Credit Default Swap Solution, 2011 Colum.
The results showed that with increasing severity of depression, a specific hindsight bias pattern emerged - exaggerated foreseeability and inevitability of negative (but not positive) event outcomes, as well as a tendency to misremember initial expectations in line with negative outcomes.
Recent scholarship in the area of FTL applied to LBOs looks at the problem of hindsight bias inherent in failed LBO litigation.
Alternatively, companies that end up bankrupt may not be more likely to commit fraud, but hindsight bias may lead to the perception that bankruptcy is associated with fraud.
The hindsight bias is the tendency to regard things that have occurred as having been relatively predictable and obvious.
Reading these analyses we have an impression that the authors exactly knew what would happen and when, while they only fall prey to hindsight bias.
Hindsight bias should be addressed in the process of identifying potential strategies to prevent recurrence of an error or adverse event.
52) The TSM test was developed by the Federal Circuit as a tool that could be applied by district court judges to fight against hindsight bias, a recognized phenomenon by which an invention, once it has been disclosed, appears obvious in hindsight.
The hindsight bias plays a role with physicians (83) but also with judges and more particularly in tort cases as well.
Experimentally, the hindsight bias is typically demonstrated by varying the outcome of a story presented to participants and asking them to estimate the likelihood of this outcome as if they were not aware of it.
resulting hindsight bias is the source of much doctrinal (179) and
By demonstrating the existence of such cognitive biases as the hindsight bias, (163) the entity effect, (164) and the representative heuristic effect, behavioral psychologists have demonstrated just how irrational we are.