Hill reaction


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

Hill re·ac·tion

(hil),
that portion of the photosynthesis reaction that involves the photolysis of water and the liberation of oxygen and does not include carbon dioxide fixation. It involves the addition of oxidants (quinones or ferricyanide) to chloroplasts; upon illumination, O2 is evolved and the added oxidant is reduced.
[R. Hill]

Hill reaction

a reaction in which oxygen and hydrogen are produced from water when CHLOROPLASTS are illuminated in the presence of a strong oxidizing agent, such as a ferric salt, reported by Robin Hill in 1936. Hill was, however, unable to achieve assimilation of carbon dioxide by chloroplasts (see CALVIN CYCLE). We now know that his experiments were an indication that PHOTOSYNTHESIS is a two-stage process and that he was demonstrating LIGHT REACTIONS.

Hill,

Robert, English plant physiologist, 1899–.
Hill reaction - that portion of the photosynthesis reaction that involves the photolysis of water and the liberation of oxygen and does not include carbon dioxide fixation.
Mentioned in ?