hierarchy

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hi·er·ar·chy

(hī'ĕr-ar-kē, hī-rar'kē),
1. Any system of people or things ranked one above the other.
2. In psychology and psychiatry, an organization of habits or concepts in which simpler components are combined to form increasingly complex integrations.
[G. hierarchia, rule or power of the high priest]

hierarchy

(hī′ə-rär′kē, hī′rär′-)
n. pl. hierar·chies
1. A group of persons or things organized into successive ranks or grades with each level subordinate to the one above: a career spent moving up through the military hierarchy.
2. Categorization or arrangement of a group of people or things into such ranks or grades: classification by hierarchy; discounting the effects of hierarchy.
3. A group of animals in which certain members or subgroups dominate or submit to others.

hi·er·ar·chy

(hī'ĕr-ahr-kē)
1. Any system of people or things ranked one above the other.
2. psychology/psychiatry An organization of habits or concepts in which simpler components are combined to form increasingly complex integrations.
[G. hierarchia, rule or power of the high priest]

hierarchy

(in CLASSIFICATION) the system of ranking in a graded order from species to kingdom. see HIGHER CATEGORY.

hi·er·ar·chy

(hī'ĕr-ahr-kē)
Any system of people or things ranked one above the other.
[G. hierarchia, rule or power of the high priest]
References in periodicals archive ?
The supporters of analytical hierarchism, by contrast, attributed any observed differences between individuals to their innately dissimilar natures, with some natures being distinctly inferior to others.
The medical model of disability as well as hierarchism and "charity of helping" are prevalent in Japan and constitute the foundation of laws, policy, and practices in current Japanese disability fields including special education (Kodama, 1998; Nakano et al.; Yamaguchi & Kaneko, 2000).
The competing cultures of hierarchism and individualism provide the basis for grid-group method.
Thus, insofar as Christianity is based not on the teaching and example of the Jew Jesus--what he thought, taught, and wrought--as the basic touchstone for all Christian belief and praxis but on other parts of the New Testament, especially the above Stoic patriarchal hierarchism found in the deutero-Pauline and pseudoPetrine letters, there is also a great similarity between traditional Confucianism and traditional Christianity.