Hick's law


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Hick's law

a law specifying the linear relationship between choice reaction time and the number of response options available, stating that choice reaction time increases as a function of the logarithm of the number of alternatives. See also reaction time.
References in periodicals archive ?
Written by two expert martial artists, both with extensive experience in police work, Timing in the Fighting Arts covers everything from Hick's Law (that reaction time increases the more choices one has--therefore it's faster and more effective to have one simple defense than a dozen complex ones) to improving one's posture to approaching a potentially dangerous person and timing a grab, to "need-to-know" information--and debunked myths--about translating sport fighting to a street situation.
The chapter focuses on qualitative methods for evaluating interface designs, such as Card, Moran, and Newell's goals, objects, methods, and selections (GOMS) model; Fitt's law; and Hick's law.
Hick's law states that the RT to a given reaction stimulus that is selected from among n alternative stimuli can be expressed by the regression of RT on the binary logarithm of n.