Hib disease

Hib disease

an infection caused by Haemophilus influenzae type B (Hib), which mainly affects children in the first 5 years of life. It is a leading cause of bacterial meningitis, as well as childhood bacterial pneumonia, joint or bone infections, and throat inflammations. More than two thirds of the U.S. cases of Hib disease have been attributed to exposure in day-care centers. It is fatal in about 5% of infections. The infection can generally be prevented with a vaccine, given in infancy, usually at 2, 4, 6, and 12 to 18 months.

Hib disease

An infection caused by Haemophilus influenza type b (Hib). This disease mainly affects children under the age of five. In that age group, it is the leading cause of bacterial meningitis, pneumonia, joint and bone infections, and throat inflammations.
Mentioned in: Mental Retardation
References in periodicals archive ?
In 2014, we confirmed invasive Hib disease in 3 Amish children from 2 different communities in Missouri; 2 patients had disease caused by the ST45 strain that was implicated in the 1999-2000 Hib cluster in Pennsylvania (Table).
In 97% of healthy unvaccinated adults, circulating IgG antibodies against Hib capsular polysaccharide were above the level ensuring longterm protection against invasive Hib disease, i.
0 [micro]g/mL provide protection from invasive Hib disease in the short- and long-term, respectively.
Following the introduction of the Hib glycoconjugate vaccine, the annual incidences of invasive Hib disease and carriage (subclinical infection) in children aged <5 years decreased dramatically in countries where vaccination was implemented [8, 9].
A graph for Haemophilus influenzae type B vaccine (Hib), indicates that the incidence of invasive Hib disease had decreased from 40-100 per 100,000 children in 1980 at the time of the introduction of the vaccine, down to fewer than 1 per 100,000 in 1990.
The EPI aims to protect children against nine vaccine preventable diseases; Polio, Tuberculosis, Pertussis, Hepatitis- B, Diphtheria, Tetanus, Hib disease, Measles and pneumonia, of which pneumonia is the latest addition.
For the Hib component of the Menhibrix vaccine, immune responses in infants and toddlers following vaccination with Menhibrix were found to be comparable to immune responses in infants and toddlers who received another FDA-approved vaccine against invasive Hib disease.
It is reportedly the first combination vaccine to help prevent meningococcal serogroups C and Y and Hib disease.
Lone et al (1), have cautioned about the introduction of pentavalent vaccine, that also includes vaccine against Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib), citing several studies in support of the lower Hib disease burden in India, which stems from errors in interpretation of scientific literature.