heterotroph

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heterotroph

 [het´er-o-trōf″]
a heterotrophic organism.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

het·er·o·troph

(het'ĕr-ō-trof, -trōf),
A microorganism that obtains its carbon, as well as its energy, from organic compounds.
See also: autotroph.
[hetero- + G. trophē, nourishment]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

heterotroph

(hĕt′ər-ə-trŏf′, -trōf′)
n.
An organism that is dependent on complex organic substances for nutrition because it cannot synthesize its own food.

het′er·o·troph′ic adj.
het′er·o·troph′i·cal·ly adv.
het′er·ot′ro·phy (-ə-rŏt′rə-fē) n.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

het·er·o·troph

(het'ĕr-ō-trōf)
A microorganism that obtains its carbon, as well as its energy, from organic compounds.
See also: autotroph
[hetero- + G. trophē, nourishment]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

heterotroph

an organism dependent on obtaining organic food from the environment because it is unable to synthesize organic material. All animals, fungi, many bacteria, plants without chloroplasts and a few flowering plants (such as insectivorous plants) are heterotrophs, and they obtain almost all their organic material, either directly or indirectly, from the activity of AUTOTROPHS. See HOLOZOIC, SAPROPHYTE, PARASITE.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Clearly, the BNF process due to release of H2 during fixation stimulated the heterotrophs including B.
Fungi are heterotrophs requiring external sources of carbon for energy and cellular synthesis and they have adapted three different modes of nutrition to obtain this carbon, occurring as saprotrophs, necrotrophs and biotrophs.
Fungi in the phylum Chytridiomycota have a nearly global distribution and occupy roles as heterotrophs and saprobes in water and soil (32).
Simultaneous growth of nitrifiers (autotrophs) and heterotrophs in a single reactor with a high COD/N ratio causes low nitrification efficiency due to competition between these two bacterial groups [14].
Heterotrophs, on the other hand, (not that they had hands, of course) do not create their own food but rely on consuming other external foods to provide the energy to sustain their own life processes.
The county decided last week to ask the utility for help and to notify residents about the tests, which will scan for "Heterotrophic Plate Counts and coliform contaminates." Heterotrophs are organisms, including bacteria, yeasts and molds, that can be harmful to health.
Minimum spore forming bacteria from heated inoculum but an overall increase in heterotrophs in the rainy season suggests that more bacteria would continue at growth phase due to enrichment of nutrition.
These organisms are then replaced by heterotrophs that form a mucilaginous sheet over the original layer of bacteria-encrusted sand.
Furthermore, these results appeared to be generalizable beyond the scope of fecal indicator bacteria and included cultivable planktonic heterotrophs as well.
Chemically defined media were needed for the cultivation of heterotrophs by defining nutritional requirements.
Because of the pyrite auto-oxidation, fresh coal mine spoil is associated with high temperature, acid production and devoid of available organic nutrients, and expected to be inhabited by the extremophiles such as thermo-tolerant heterotrophs (Norris et al., 1986; Kuenen et al., 1992; Shennan, 1996; Rawlings et al., 1999 and Akbar et al., 2005), acid tolerant bacteria (Wood and Kelly, 1986; Norris, 1990; Kristjansson and Stetter, 1992; Shennan, 1996; Wulf-Durand et al., 1997; Rawlings et al., 1999; Kristjansson et al., 2000; Akbar et al., 2005).