heterotroph

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heterotroph

 [het´er-o-trōf″]
a heterotrophic organism.

het·er·o·troph

(het'ĕr-ō-trof, -trōf),
A microorganism that obtains its carbon, as well as its energy, from organic compounds.
See also: autotroph.
[hetero- + G. trophē, nourishment]

heterotroph

(hĕt′ər-ə-trŏf′, -trōf′)
n.
An organism that is dependent on complex organic substances for nutrition because it cannot synthesize its own food.

het′er·o·troph′ic adj.
het′er·o·troph′i·cal·ly adv.
het′er·ot′ro·phy (-ə-rŏt′rə-fē) n.

het·er·o·troph

(het'ĕr-ō-trōf)
A microorganism that obtains its carbon, as well as its energy, from organic compounds.
See also: autotroph
[hetero- + G. trophē, nourishment]

heterotroph

an organism dependent on obtaining organic food from the environment because it is unable to synthesize organic material. All animals, fungi, many bacteria, plants without chloroplasts and a few flowering plants (such as insectivorous plants) are heterotrophs, and they obtain almost all their organic material, either directly or indirectly, from the activity of AUTOTROPHS. See HOLOZOIC, SAPROPHYTE, PARASITE.

heterotroph

a heterotrophic organism.
References in periodicals archive ?
The number of open containers that exceeded standards for coliforms was significantly greater than that for bottles, but there was no significant difference for heterotrophs.
Apparently these heterotrophs are taking advantage of the greater concentration of settling particles at the thermocline.
Some heterotrophs do not seem to respond to any of the compounds tested so far; others will grow much faster and reach a higher concentration when given compounds from certain autotrophs, but not others.
It is instructive to compare the results this field study obtained for heterotrophs with those obtained by Gerba et al.
A key to my research is that autotrophs and heterotrophs each prefer to use a different form of carbon.
Most of these bacteria are heterotrophs and are responsible for the breakdown of dead organic matter.
1998) and weak competitive inhibition by heterotrophs for available N[H.
The chemosynthetic production may be a significant source of nutrition to heterotrophs found there in an otherwise nutrient-poor deep ocean, (Carney 1994, Pequegnat 1983).
Like animals, fungi are heterotrophs and cannot create their own food; but, like plants, fungi have cell walls, and are for the most part immobile.