sexual intercourse

(redirected from Heterosexual sex)
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intercourse

 [in´ter-kors]
1. mutual exchange.
sexual intercourse
1. coitus.
2. any physical contact between two individuals involving stimulation of the genital organs of at least one.

sex·u·al in·ter·course

coitophobia, cypridophobia.

sexual intercourse

n.
1. Sexual union between a male and a female involving insertion of the penis into the vagina.
2. Sexual activity that includes insertion of the penis into the anus or mouth.

sexual intercourse

See coitus.
The act in which the external male reproductive organ—penis—enters the external/accessible female reproductive tract—vagina

co·i·tus

(kō'i-tŭs)
Sexual union.
Synonym(s): coition, copulation (1) , pareunia, sexual intercourse.
[L.]

sexual intercourse

1. The totality of the physical and mental interplay between humans in which the explicit or implicit goal is bodily union and, ideally, the expression of love and affection.
2. COITUS.

intercourse

mutual exchange.

sexual intercourse
coitus.

sexual

pertaining to sex.

sexual behavior
includes masturbation, courtship, mating, estral display.
sexual cycle
estral cycle.
sexual differentiation
identification of the sex of a patient is done usually by an examination of external genitalia; preparation and examination of a karyotype is the preferred laboratory method.
sexual dimorphism
differences in structure or physical characteristics between males and females of the same species, e.g. horns in some breeds of sheep, feather coat color in many species of birds.
sexual intercourse
see mating.
sexual maturity
capable of mating. Occurs at different ages in different species and in different races and even breeds.
sexual receptivity
behavioral changes in female animals at the time of estrus; involves acceptance of male efforts at copulation and, in some species, actively seeking the male.
sexual rest
circumstances in which no sexual intercourse takes place.

Patient discussion about sexual intercourse

Q. what tests do i need to do to check that i don't have HIV? and how long does it take to get an answer? i had unprotected sex with this girl i met , and i am really afraid , things just happened really quickly and we had sex and i did not use condom , what should i do ?

A. If you think that you have HIV or you just want to be sure, you should go to your nearest clinic and get tested. They will know what tests you would need to take. Some clinics even do this kind of testing for free. Here is a website on different testings a nd prices: http://www.requestatest.com/STDtesting.aspx?utm_source=yahoo&utm_medium=cpc&utm_term=std-testing&utm_campaign=std_g01 You should always use precaution when having intercourse. You can never be to safe. Hope this helps.

More discussions about sexual intercourse
References in periodicals archive ?
The proportion of respondents who had never had heterosexual sex declined from 40% in Wave 1 to 6% in Wave 3 (Table 1).
According to UNAIDS, the most common modes of transmission in cases reported in Jordan in recent years are heterosexual sex, followed by blood transfusions and mother to child transfusions, homosexual sex and drug use by injection.
The figures reveal 698 contracted HIV through heterosexual sex, while 465 were infected by homosexual transmission, with twice as many men as women contracting the virus.
It's straight consenting sex, heterosexual sex, and I've got nothing at all to be ashamed of.
However, it can also be transmitted through heterosexual sex, blood transfusions, childbirth and breastfeeding.
Oscar, similar to heterosexual and gay men who experienced first sex outside of a romantic commitment, felt the literal gaze of other men, which prompted, compelled, and encouraged him to experience first heterosexual sex.
And although it is often seen as a disease mainly affecting the gay community, most new infections are transmitted through heterosexual sex, it has been revealed.
My mother contracted HIV through heterosexual sex in 1986, a time when women--especially white-middle-aged, divorced morns from upstate New York--were not considered a group at risk.
Unlike their straight counterparts, gay youths are often unable to define themselves as sexual beings, because the familiar definitions of heterosexual sex and virginity do not apply.
This is especially true for young women between the ages of and 24, of whom 75% are believed to have been infected through heterosexual sex.
Having desensitized us to their satisfaction regarding heterosexual sex, Hollywood now sees fit to propagate the love that won't speak its name as often and as robustly as possible.
Among women, a majority of those with AIDS contracted the virus through heterosexual sex.