heteronomy


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het·er·on·o·my

(het'ĕr-on'ō-mē),
The condition or state of being heteronomous.
[hetero- + G. nomos, law]

het·er·on·o·my

(het'ĕr-on'ŏ-mē)
The condition or state of being heteronomous.
[hetero- + G. nomos, law]
References in periodicals archive ?
The language here seems just as strict as in his discussion of what counts as moral law, where he claims that any empirical reliance whatsoever introduces heteronomy and therefore destroys autonomy, with no middle ground.
(8) I am referring to Anceschi's concept of 'heteronomy' as opposed to 'autonomy' of art with regards to broader socio-historical forces as articulated in his Autonomia ed eteronimia dell'arte.
Tillich experienced heteronomy and autonomy--but not theonomy--firsthand.
He claims that Pessoa's heteronomy "Es, para el, la unica manera de poblar su soledad" ("Heteronimos" 26).
Kant saw independence or autonomy in opposition to heteronomy (i.e., lack of moral freedom or self-determination).
As mentioned previously in Part I, he identifies three theoretical approaches, namely heteronomy, theonomy, and autonomy.
Unconditionally rejecting any form of religious heteronomy, Kant expressed an attitude of absolute autonomy before any authority, claiming a privileged source of knowledge.
The debate that animated the pages of Il menabo prompted the editors of Il Verri to organize a gathering in Palermo from which would emerge a full-blown discussion of the most important issues associated with the neoavanguardia, now solidified in Gruppo '63: linguistic experimentation and socio-political commitment, autonomy and heteronomy of art in late-capitalism, the role of the reader, the effective possibilities of the avant-gardist project, and so on.
Yet one can't help feeling that his emphasis on heteronomy and stasis, while deviating from mainstream musical convention, is actually suited for our own time, a postmodernity marked by an intensive sense of the here and now rather than a historically produced form of being.
In the second chapter, he explains that Rand's interpretation of Kant's ethics is completely wrong partly because of Rand's failure to attend to Kant's stress on the distinction between autonomy and heteronomy. His remarks on this distinction are inadequate.
Douzinas' recognition of the significance of Levinas in legal thinking is to be welcomed and may contribute to a shift of emphasis from autonomy to heteronomy in the study of justice.
Among the moral extremes depicted, there is an infinity of miner variations apparently inconsistent with major principles, be it heteronomy or autonomy.