heterocyclic amine


Also found in: Acronyms.

heterocyclic amine

Any of a family of potentially carcinogenic compounds present in grilled meat, such as PhIP and A alpha C, which volatalise and may represent a risk factor for malignancy in those who often grill meat (e.g., short-order cooks).

heterocyclic amine

Any of a family of potential carcinogens present in grilled meat–eg, PhIP and AαC, compounds that volatalize. See Animal fat.
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Also, the adsorption of the neutral heterocyclic amine derivatives could occur through to the formation of links between the d-orbital of iron atoms, involving the displacement of water molecules from the metal surface, and the lone sp2 electron pairs present on the N, and O atoms and p-orbitals in aromatic ring, blocking the active sites on the steel surface and therefore decreasing the corrosion rate.
Cancer risk of heterocyclic amines in cooked foods: an analysis and implications for research.
Cooking meat at high temperatures produces heterocyclic amines (HCAs) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, compounds that potentially promote cancer development (Felton, Knize, Salmon, Malfatti, & Kulp, 2002).
These highly potent inhibitory effects of dibenzoylmethane against heterocyclic amines observed in our preliminary investigations strongly warrant further studies of its efficacy as a cancer chemopreventive agent.
Study of the forces of stabilizing complexes between chlorophylls and heterocyclic amine mutagens.
These studies suggest that tea constituents inhibit the enzyme(s) which generate the aryl nitrenium ion and directly scavenge the reactive electrophile, whereas CHL complexes with heterocyclic amines and facilitates the degradation of active metabolites.
A growing body of data suggests, however, that well-done meat, rife with heterocyclic amines (HCAs), poses a substantial, preventable cancer threat.
Cooking meat, poultry, or fish at high temperatures until well done can create heterocyclic amines (HCAs) and polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs).
Comments on the history and importance of aromatic and heterocyclic amines in public health.
High-heat cooking methods such as pan frying or barbecuing produce high concentrations of known or suspected carcinogens, including heterocyclic amines and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.
Cooking meat at high temperatures, such as pan frying, deep-fat frying, oven broiling, and grilling, leads to formation of carcinogens called heterocyclic amines (HCAs)," says Mariana Stern, PhD, a cancer epidemiologist and associate professor at the University of Southern California in Los Angeles.