heteroclitic


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heteroclitic

adjective Referring to an immune response in which antibodies cross-react with an extensive palette of antigens.
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At that time, term of "heteroclitic" was probably unfamiliar to even Immunologists.
A minor revises were required, but it was smoothly accepted in 1978.2) Thus production of anti-poly(ADP-ribose) seemed to be due to "heteroclitic reactions" happened in rabbits during sensitization with poly(A)-poly(U).
When the time has passed more than three decades since "our second paper (2) on "heteroclitic" described above, I wonder that "Was anti-poly(ADP-ribose) antibody induced by pol(A)-poly(U) really heteroclitic?" So, I retrospectively searched the "ontogeny" of heteroclitic antibody or heteroclitic, and noticed that the term originally "heterclitic" has been widely used with time especially in cancer immunology field, such as heteroclitic epitopes, heteroclitic peptides or heteroclitic immunization.
Thus Fraser's public sphere, although incorporating the credo of Foucault's heterotopia (that which is exhibited by the heteroclitic), is intrinsically a utopia, for her world of multiplicities only looks forward.
For Djebar, time is above all a "force," an intensive force essentially made up of heteroclitic events and instants not yet gathered together in a final synthesis or in a teleological concept of the Future.
These heteroclitic and incongruous objects, there visions of childhood with no apparent connection, evince a diffuse malaise that contrasts with the care and precision of their technical realization.
His contact with members of the Beat generation during his stay at the Chelsea hotel in 1962, and with hippie ideology from his numerous stays in California between '63 and '68 might explain why Raysse followed a route typical of the period: a questioning of his own work--the fabrication of "things," little symbolic and ritual heteroclitic objects, as in the series "Coco Mato," 1971-73, from the Italian name for the hallucinogenic mushroom Amanita muscaria.