herbicide

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herbicide

 [her´bĭ-sīd]
an agent that is destructive to weeds or causes an alteration in their normal growth.

herbicide

[er′-, her′bisīd]
an agent that is destructive to weeds or causes an alteration in their normal growth.

herb·i·cide

(ĕr'bi-sīd)
Any chemical compound designed to kill plants. Herbicides have been used in military operations for deforestation, but the U.S. military excludes herbicides from being classified as chemical-warfare agents.

herbicide

any chemical that kills plants. Herbicides can be highly selective. For example, 2,4-D only kills DICOTYLEDONS (broad-leaved plants), leaving MONOCOTYLEDONS unharmed.

herbicide

a substance that destroys weeds. A large number of chemical compounds are used as general and selective herbicides. Most of them have very low toxicity because their availability to animals on recently sprayed pasture is an obvious toxic hazard. Most poisoning incidents arise when animals have accidental access to large volumes of the agent, e.g. if there has been a spillage. The well-known herbicide groupings are bipyridyls, chlorinated acids, dinitro compounds, phenoxyacid derivatives, thiocarbamates and triazines.
References in periodicals archive ?
Smallflower umbrella sedge (Cyperus difformis) and California arrowhead (Sagittaria montevidensis) resistance to ALS-inhibiting herbicides was first reported in California rice fields in 1993 following repeated use of bensulfuron (Hill et al.
The treatments were mixed with 30 gallons of water per acre at various rates and combinations of herbicides.
company produces insecticides, herbicides, and fungicides.
Both of these mechanisms have been simulated in genetically engineered crops either by over expressing the target enzymes or by engineering foreign proteins that can rapidly detoxify the herbicides (Freyssinet, 2003).
Resistant weeds have become a major problem for many farmers reliant on GE crops, and they are now driving up the volume of herbicide needed each year by about 25 percent," Benbrook said.
Stephen Powles of the University of Western Australia in Perth notes that in his country, some weedy ryegrass species "can be resistant to seven different herbicide types, meaning there are almost no herbicides which still work.
Many modern chemical herbicides for agriculture are specifically formulated to decompose within a short period after application.
The task force calls for a return to a county policy put in effect in 2003, which identified herbicides as the weed-control method of last resort.
It is need of time to conserve environment by reducing use of herbicides but we cannot compensate the yield loses on the other hand.
Nutrients mineralization and enzymes activity in the soil performed by soil microbes are affected by herbicides application and indicate signal of stress (Anderson and Domsch, 1980).
However, those same environmental conditions also favor the growth of several weed species, and growers use herbicides to manage them.