Henipavirus


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Related to Henipavirus: Hendra virus

Henipavirus

a genus in the family Paramyxoviridae which includes Hendra virus and Nipah virus. See equine henipavirus.
References in periodicals archive ?
Henipavirus RNA is tightly bound to N (nucleocapsid) protein and is associated with the L (large) and P (phosphoprotein) proteins, which provide RNA polymerase activity during replication.
Evidence of henipavirus infection in West African fruit bats.
The Henipavirus genus is 1 of 7 genera in this subfamily and contains the first recorded zoonotic paramyxoviruses, Hendra virus and Nipah virus.
These bat species are known to carry coronaviruses (particularly Hipposideridae bats) (11); hantaviruses (particularly Nycteridae bats) (12); paramyxoviruses, including henipavirus (13); and filoviruses (14).
The pattern of neutralizing antibodies and IgM in acute-phase and convalescent-phase serum samples is evidence of recent exposure to a henipavirus.
To the Editor: The genus Henipavirus (family Paramyxoviridae) contains 3 established species (Hendra virus, Nipah virus, and Cedar virus) and 19 newly identified species, including 1 full-length sequenced virus, Bat Paramyxovirus Eidhel/GH-M74a/ GHA/2009 (1,2).
The henipavirus surface-expressed G glycoprotein has the critical role of initiating infection by binding to receptors on host cells, and antibodies directed against this protein can neutralize virus (19).
Bats have been considered natural hosts of a wide diversity of viruses, including human pathogens such as lyssaviruses, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus, henipavirus, and filoviruses (1).
To the Editor: In 2010, detection of henipavirus (Hendra or Nipah virus) and rubulavirus (Tioman or Menangle virus) antibodies in fruit bats in Papua New Guinea (PNG) was reported (1).
Henipavirus and Tioman virus antibodies in pteropodid bats, Madagascar.
Clinical outcome of henipavirus infection in hamsters is determined by the route and dose of infection.
In a small proportion of cases, relapse with encephalitis after a mild acute phase is a feature of henipavirus infection and is often fatal.