hemotoxin

(redirected from Hemotoxicity)

hemotoxin

 [he´mo-tok″sin]
an exotoxin characterized by hemolytic activity.

he·mo·tox·in

(hē'mō-tok'sin),
Any substance that causes destruction of red blood cells, including various hemolysins; usually used with reference to substances of biologic origin, in contrast to chemicals.
Synonym(s): hematotoxin, hematoxin

he·mo·tox·in

(hē'mō-tok'sin)
Any substance that destroys red blood cells, including various hemolysins; usually used with reference to substances of biologic origin, in contrast to chemicals.
Synonym(s): hematotoxin, haemotoxin.

he·mo·tox·in

(hē'mō-tok'sin)
Any substance that destroys red blood cells; used with reference to substances of biologic origin, in contrast to chemicals.
Synonym(s): haemotoxin.
References in periodicals archive ?
A study by George and Adoke suggested that gasoline induced hemolysis of red blood cells in albino rats could be prevented by feeding them vitamin E rich diet showing the antioxidant property of this vitamin against hemotoxicity.26 Role of vitamin E as an erythrocyte forming factor was demonstrated in a study by Gogu et al in a murine model.27 Addition of d1/4-tocopherol to mouse bone marrow cells in culture led to a dosedependent increase in erythroid colony forming units (CFU-E).
[14] Kenry, "Understanding the hemotoxicity of graphene nanomaterials through their interactions with blood proteins and cells," Journal of Materials Research, pp.
The main illnesses related to benzene are linked to its hemotoxicity and genotoxicity caused by its metabolization.
Value of percentage hemotoxicity was also much low which indicated that dyes did not exhibit toxicity.
Chourpa, "Efficacy and hemotoxicity of stealth doxorubicin-loaded magnetic nanovectors on breast cancer xenografts," Journal of Biomedical Nanotechnology, vol.
Hemotoxicity induced by chronic chlorpyrifos exposure in wistar rats: mitigating effect of vitamin C.
The reduction in the three blood parameters maybe attributed to the hemotoxicity of vicine which resulted in the premature removal of damaged red cells by the spleen [35].
Each entry also includes recent references, including those on synthetic methods, major applications and safety, and toxicity data includes acute, aquatic, carcinogenicity, cytotoxicity, ecotoxicity, genotoxicity, hemotoxicity and other information as it is available.