Haemophilus influenzae

(redirected from Hemophilus influenzae)

Hae·moph·i·lus in·flu·en·'zae

Avoid the misspelling H. influenza and the jargonistic abridgment H. flu.
a bacterial species found in the respiratory tract that causes acute respiratory infections, including pneumonia, acute conjunctivitis, otitis, and purulent meningitis in children (in adults in whom it contributes to sinusitis and chronic bronchitis). Originally considered to be the cause of influenza, it is the type species of the genus Haemophilus.

Haemophilus influenzae

a small gram-negative nonmotile parasitic bacterium that occurs in two forms, encapsulated and nonencapsulated, and in six types, a, b, c, d, e, and f. Almost all infections are caused by encapsulated type b organisms. H. influenzae is found in the nasopharynx of approximately 75% of healthy children and adults. In children and in debilitated older people, severe destructive inflammation of the larynx, trachea, and bronchi may result from infection. Subacute bacterial endocarditis, purulent meningitis, and pneumonia also may be caused by it. Secondary infection by H. influenzae occurs in influenza and in many other respiratory diseases. Several H. influenzae B conjugate vaccines are available.

Hae·moph·i·lus in·flu·en·zae

(hē-mof'i-lŭs in-flū-en'zē)
A bacterial species found in the respiratory tract that causes acute respiratory infections including pneumonia, acute conjunctivitis, bacterial meningitis, and purulent meningitis in children, rarely in adults; originally considered to be the cause of influenza, it is the type species of the genus Haemophilus.
Synonym(s): Pfeiffer bacillus, Weeks bacillus.

Hae·moph·i·lus in·flu·en·zae

(hē-mof'i-lŭs in-flū-en'zē)
Bacterial species found in the respiratory tract that causes acute respiratory infections, including pneumonia and otitis.
References in periodicals archive ?
A noticeable change in the epidemiologic pattern of supraglottitis has occurred since the introduction of Hemophilus influenzae b vaccines.
Although Streptococcus pneumoniae, S aureus, and Hemophilus influenzae are generally the most common pathogenic causes of acute mastoiditis, there have been reports of a change in the type of causative organisms as a consequence of antibiotic use.
3] However, the same study has also shown that HIV patients are more likely to suffer from sinusitis caused by the more atypical agents, such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Hemophilus influenzae, Staphylococcus aureus, coagulase-negative staphylococcus, Candida albicans, Klebsiellapneumoniae, Listeria monocytogenes, and Torulopsis (Candida) glabrata.
The data presented in this article support other findings that have implicated coagulasenegative staphylococci as potential pathogens, and they complement existing data regarding the increasing prevalence of beta-lactamase-positive Hemophilus influenzae.
Most often, the offending pathogens are Streptococcus pneumoniae, Hemophilus influenzae and Moraxella catarrhalis.
1) * Includes: Klebsiella oxytoca (10 isolates), Klebsiella pneumoniae (10), group A beta-hemolytic streptococci (9), Hemophilus influenzae (9), Proteus mirabilis (8), Citrobacter kooseri (6), Neisseria species (5), Candida albicans (4), Serratia species (4), group G beta-hemolytic streptococci (3), Burkholderia gladioli (2), Enterobacter gergoviae (2), Escherichia colt (2), Proteus vulgaris (2), Acinetobacter baumannii (1), Arcanobacterium hemolyticum (1), Citrobacter freundii (1), Enterococcus faecalis (1), Moraxella species (1), Morganella morganii (1), Pseudomonas putida (1), and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia (1).
In children, the most common bacterial species associated with acute conjunctivitis are Hemophilus influenzae, Streptococcus pnuemoniae , and Staphylococcus species.
pyogenes (one case), and the gram-negative bacteria were Hemophilus influenzae group B (three cases), Neisseria meningitidis (five cases), and Escherichia coli (one case).
1) Paparella et al identified four distinct clinical types: (1) silent otitis media in infants with Hemophilus influenzae meningitis, (2) the continuum of silent otitis media, (3) the sequelae of silent otitis media, and (4) chronic silent otitis media.
9,10) Other organisms that have been implicated are Streptococcus pneumoniae, Brucella spp, Hemophilus influenzae, Salmonella spp, Serratia marcescens, and Candida albicans.
1) Two notable exceptions pertain to Hemophilus influenzae and Streptococcus pneumoniae; any presence of these organisms--even if it is only with a 1+ growth index--is sufficient to qualify as pathogenic.
Tuberculosis, STDs excluding HIV, Chlamydia, Gonorrhea, Syphilis, HIV/AIDS, Diarrheal diseases, Childhood diseases, Pertussis, Measles, Tetanus, Poliomyelitis, Diphtheria, Meningitis, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Meningococcemia without, Hemophilus influenzae, Hepatitis B, Hepatitis C, Malaria, Lower respiratory infections including Influenza, pneumonia, or others