Haemophilus influenzae

(redirected from Hemophilus influenzae)

Hae·moph·i·lus in·flu·en·'zae

Avoid the misspelling H. influenza and the jargonistic abridgment H. flu.
a bacterial species found in the respiratory tract that causes acute respiratory infections, including pneumonia, acute conjunctivitis, otitis, and purulent meningitis in children (in adults in whom it contributes to sinusitis and chronic bronchitis). Originally considered to be the cause of influenza, it is the type species of the genus Haemophilus.

Haemophilus influenzae

a small gram-negative nonmotile parasitic bacterium that occurs in two forms, encapsulated and nonencapsulated, and in six types, a, b, c, d, e, and f. Almost all infections are caused by encapsulated type b organisms. H. influenzae is found in the nasopharynx of approximately 75% of healthy children and adults. In children and in debilitated older people, severe destructive inflammation of the larynx, trachea, and bronchi may result from infection. Subacute bacterial endocarditis, purulent meningitis, and pneumonia also may be caused by it. Secondary infection by H. influenzae occurs in influenza and in many other respiratory diseases. Several H. influenzae B conjugate vaccines are available.

Hae·moph·i·lus in·flu·en·zae

(hē-mof'i-lŭs in-flū-en'zē)
A bacterial species found in the respiratory tract that causes acute respiratory infections including pneumonia, acute conjunctivitis, bacterial meningitis, and purulent meningitis in children, rarely in adults; originally considered to be the cause of influenza, it is the type species of the genus Haemophilus.
Synonym(s): Pfeiffer bacillus, Weeks bacillus.

Hae·moph·i·lus in·flu·en·zae

(hē-mof'i-lŭs in-flū-en'zē)
Bacterial species found in the respiratory tract that causes acute respiratory infections, including pneumonia and otitis.
References in periodicals archive ?
3) Diphtheria, tetanus, acellular pertussis, inactivated poliomyelitis + Hemophilus influenzae type b vaccine alliance, a total amount of 54,000 doses
Gram negative bacteria include Moraxella catarrhalis (13%), Klebsiella pneumoniae (5%), Hemophilus influenzae (2%), E.
Not only do persons with chronic bronchitis experience viral infections, they commonly develop bacterial infections, generally from Hemophilus influenzae, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and Moraxella catarrhalis.
The company added the drug is being evaluated in the treatment of moderate to severe community acquired bacterial pneumonia caused by azithromycin-resistant pneumococcus, Legionella, Mycoplasma, Moraxella, Hemophilus influenzae and community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.
The time has passed when large numbers of children and adults suffered serious, life threatening illness from viruses including poliovirus, measles virus, influenza viruses, hepatitis B virus and varicella zoster virus or faced lifelong disability or death from bacterial infections including Hemophilus influenzae, meningococcus and pneumococcus, all infections that can be prevented now by effective vaccines.
Bacterial superinfection may nevertheless follow, often due to pneumococci, streptococci and Hemophilus influenzae.
They also found a child's odds of being diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) were less in counties with higher vaccination rates of inactive polio vaccine and Hemophilus influenzae vaccine.
Hemophilus influenzae and Legionella pneumophila were also readily inactivated, and their pro-inflammatory responses reversed.
The 10-valent pneumococcal non-ty peable Hemophilus influenzae protein D conjugate vaccine (PHID-CV) coadministered with DTPw-HBV/Hib and poliovirus vaccines: assessment of immunogenicity.
A recent study from Bangladesh on Hemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) (9), acknowledges funding from the Asian Development Bank and USAID, technical help from WHO, and Hib vaccine costing millions from Sanofi Pasteur.
Multiple myeloma presenting with Hemophilus influenzae septic arthritis: Case report and review of the literature.
In 2002, among diseases for which vaccines are universally recommended, WHO estimates that fewer than 1,000 children aged <5 years died from polio; 4,000 children died from diphtheria; 15,000 children died from yellow fever; 198,000 children died from tetanus; 294,000 children died from pertussis; 386,000 children died from Hemophilus influenzae type b (Hib); and 540,000 children died from measles (4).