Hemiptera


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Related to Hemiptera: Hymenoptera, Siphonaptera

Hemiptera

 [hem-ip´ter-ah]
the true bugs, an order of arthropods (class Insecta) with over 30,000 species, usually characterized by the presence of two pairs of wings and mouth parts adapted for piercing or sucking.

He·mip·ter·a

(hem-ip'tĕr-ă),
An arthropod order of the class Insecta that includes many plant lice and other true bugs; those of the subfamily Triatominae are bloodsuckers and of medical importance. The best known species is Cimex lectularius, the common bedbug.
[hemi- + G. pteron, wing]

Hemiptera

/He·mip·tera/ (he-mip´ter-ah) an order of insects, winged or wingless, including ordinary bugs and lice, having mouth parts adapted for piercing and sucking.

Hemiptera

an order of arthropods (class Insecta); includes some 30,000 species, known as the true bugs; characterized by having mouthparts adapted to piercing or sucking, and usually having two pairs of wings.
References in periodicals archive ?
In contrast Diptera and Hemiptera were consumed less than expected by their availability by all broods, Orthoptera consumed less than expected by eight broods, and Hymenoptera consumed less than expected by six broods.
2010) reported the temporal variations in abundance and diversity of various macro- invertebrate groups such as Orthoptera Hemiptera and Auchenorrhyncha.
Among them the wheat and brassica crop in CWZ were preferred by many species of Odonata, Hemiptera, Coleoptera, Diptera and Araneae.
The highest numbers of species were in the orders Coleoptera, Diptera, Hymenoptera, and Hemiptera.
Fecal analysis showed that eastern pipistrelles preyed on members of six insect orders: Homoptera, Coleoptera, Diptera, Lepidoptera, Hemiptera and Hymenoptera.
The diversity, number of individuals, and species of Hemiptera and their natural enemies were similar in all four cardinal directions of branches of host trees.
sanguinea listed by Peck (1963) are clearly incorrect as members of the genus are egg parasitoids of Hemiptera, particularly Cicadellidae (Pinto and Viggiani, 2004).
Within the Insecta, they are characteristic of many orders, including Hemiptera (Camacho et al.
noctivagans, feed extensively on Lepidoptera and Diptera, as well as on Homoptera, Hemiptera, Hymenoptera, Coleoptera and Neuroptera (Black, 1974; Whitaker et al.
However, because we were interested in evaluating Hemiptera known to bite humans, the families Belostomatidae, Naucoridae, and Nepidae also were included, although each represented <2% of total collections.