hemotoxin

(redirected from Hematotoxicity)

hemotoxin

 [he´mo-tok″sin]
an exotoxin characterized by hemolytic activity.

he·mo·tox·in

(hē'mō-tok'sin),
Any substance that causes destruction of red blood cells, including various hemolysins; usually used with reference to substances of biologic origin, in contrast to chemicals.
Synonym(s): hematotoxin, hematoxin

hemotoxin

/he·mo·tox·in/ (-tok″sin) an exotoxin characterized by hemolytic activity.

he·mo·tox·in

(hē'mō-tok'sin)
Any substance that destroys red blood cells, including various hemolysins; usually used with reference to substances of biologic origin, in contrast to chemicals.
Synonym(s): hematotoxin, haemotoxin.

he·mo·tox·in

(hē'mō-tok'sin)
Any substance that destroys red blood cells; used with reference to substances of biologic origin, in contrast to chemicals.
Synonym(s): haemotoxin.

hemotoxin

an exotoxin characterized by hemolytic activity.
References in periodicals archive ?
Occupational exposure to formaldehyde, hematotoxicity, and leukemiaspecific chromosome changes in cultured myeloid progenitor cells.
Hematotoxicity in Workers Exposed to Low Level of Benzene.
Protective effects of selenium against potassium dichromate-induced hematotoxicity in female and male Wistar albino rats.
Protective effect of -Tochopherol against hematotoxicity, hepatotoxicity and nepherotoxicity induced by Nickel sulphate in male Albino rats.
Hematotoxicity of Bacillus thuringiensis as spore-crystal strains Cry1Aa, Cry1Ab, Cry1Ac or Cry2Aa in Swiss albino mice.
Mechanisms of benzene-induced hematotoxicity and leukemogenicity: cDNA microarray analyses using mouse bone marrow tissue.
A complete blood count has been recognized as an easy and readily available screening tool for assessing the hematotoxicity of benzene.
Over exposure of nickel may cause several types of disorders such as skin allergic reactions, hematotoxicity, immunotoxicity, nephrotoxicity and lungs cancer [10, 11].
However, the mechanisms of benzene hematotoxicity and carcinogenicity in humans remain unknown.
Mezzomo BP, Miranda-Vilela AL de Souza Freire I, et al, Hematotoxicity of Bacillus thuringiensis as spore-crystal strains Cry1Aa, Cry1Ab, CrylAc or Cry2Aa in Swiss albino mice.
high-dosage systemic administration of ABS in an in vivo animal model was shown to not cause mucosa] toxicity, hematotoxicity, hepatotoxicity, nephrotoxicity, or biochemical toxicity (27).