HemAssist

HemAssist

Transfusion medicine A proprietary–Baxter Intl–non-FDA-approved artificial blood, consisting of polyethylene glycol conjugated to cross-linked Hb from outdated blood. See Artificial blood, Blood substitutes.
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However because of the broad, multipeak spectrum characteristic of HBOC products (associated with the different molecular size species typically evident in HBOC products), the absence of a single definable peak prevents the specification of a LOD derived from a simple signal-to-noise ratio (with the exception of HemAssist, which has only a single peak).
The profiles from Oxyglobin, Hemopure, and HemAssist, which are either available commercially or have ceased development, are included in Fig.
The LOD for the different HBOC products were 0.2 g/L (Oxyglobin and Hemopure), 0.3 g/L (HemAssist and PolyHeme), 0.5 g/L (PHP), and 0.8 g/L (Hemospan).
Baxter Healthcare of Deerfield, Ill., entered the fray with a product called HemAssist, which is based on a hemoglobin molecule with enhanced stability.
Baxter's product, HemAssist, started clinical safety studies in July 1992.
After the establishment of appropriate Material Transfer and Confidentiality Agreements, the following HBOC products were provided by the respective pharmaceutical companies responsible for developing each product: Oxyglobin and Hemopure (glutaraldehyde-polymerized bovine Hb; Biopure Corporation), PolyHeme (glutaraldehydecross-linked pyridoxalated human Hb; Northfield Laboratories), PHP (pyridoxalated human Hb polyoxyethylene conjugate; Apex Bioscience Inc.), Hemospan (maleimide-polyethylene-glycol-conjugated human Hb; Sangart Inc.), and HemAssist (diaspirin-cross-linked human Hb; Baxter Healthcare Co.).
2, pure solutions of the different HBOCs gave rise to broad bands located in the area of the m1 marker for Hemopure (lane b), Oxyglobin (lane c), and HemAssist (lane d).
(Deerfield, IL) for supplying the DCLHb (HemAssist) and DCLHb diluent used in this study.