Helsinki Criteria

Helsinki Criteria

A group of highly controversial and flawed criteria for the diagnosis and attribution of certain lung and pleural disorders to asbestos exposure, which resulted from a consensus conference by international experts that convened in Helsinki in 1997 and 2004.
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3,4) The 1997 Helsinki criteria incorporated these findings into more evidence-based criteria for the diagnosis of asbestosis, requiring (1) diffuse interstitial fibrosis and (2) 2 or more asbestos bodies within a section area of 1 [cm.
We conclude that strict histologic criteria such as the Helsinki criteria are useful for the positive identification of asbestosis among cases of advanced pulmonary fibrosis.
Asbestos, asbestosis, and cancer: the Helsinki criteria for diagnosis and attribution.
1,2) The Helsinki Criteria were purported to be the work of a "consensus conference" whose purpose was to develop guidelines for diagnosing individual cases of asbestos-related diseases.
The Helsinki Criteria state that the risk of developing lung cancer is materially increased (by a factor of 2), even without asbestosis, under the following conditions:
For example, shipbuilding is used in the Helsinki Criteria as an example of moderate exposure to asbestos, which after 5 to 10 years would result in a doubling of risk for lung cancer; in fact, there are many different trades within the shipbuilding industry, with many different levels of asbestos exposure.
17) Unfortunately, there has been a tendency to translate a value obtained by one laboratory (using TEM) to the figures given in the Helsinki Criteria, which were obtained in one study by a Finnish laboratory using different methodologies (SEM) and counting rules.
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