Helsinki Accords

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Helsinki Accords

[helsing′kē]
a declaration signed by the representatives of 35 member nations of the Conference on Security and Cooperation in Europe in Helsinki, Finland, on August 1, 1975. The declared goals of the nonbinding document comprised four principal aspects of European security: economic cooperation, humanitarian issues, contact between the East and West, and provision for a later follow-up conference (held in Belgrade in 1978). Follow-up conferences were planned in part to allow the member nations to monitor each other's performance on humanitarian issues, such as the right to self-determination of all people and respect for fundamental freedoms, including thought, conscience, and religion or belief, without regard to race, language, sex, or religion. The Helsinki Accords grew from the precedent set by the judgments at the Nuremberg tribunals-that crimes against humanity are offenses subject to criminal prosecution. The principle and the practice of informed consent in health care grew from this precedent. Also called Helsinki Declaration. See also Nuremberg tribunal.
References in periodicals archive ?
But the fighting over the borders between those countries affected the Helsinki agreement.
Akram al-Hakim, Iraq's minister of reconciliation and a signatory to the deal, said: "The Helsinki Agreement has the potential to bring the Iraqi political parties together in common cause in a way that no endeavour has .
The Helsinki agreement, signed by figures representing the Iraqi political mosaic last June, provides for commitment to Iraq's territorial integrity and unity of people, launching necessary amendments in line with constitutional mechanisms, sticking to peaceful and democratic means to settle differences and banning use of weapons by armed groups.
Drawing on the example of the Helsinki Agreement negotiated with the Soviet Union in 1975, leaders such as Southern Baptist executive Richard Land and Prison Fellowship founder Chuck Colson said similar talks with North Korea could result in progress for human rights.
All of the issues have been clarified just as was required by the Helsinki agreement," said Gen Clark.
The Helsinki agreement, which was hammered out over meetings in September and April, was signed by 33 politicians from Sunni, Shiite, Kurdish, Turkmen, Communist and other parties.

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