helium 3

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he·li·um 3

(hē'lē-ŭm),
The rare stable isotope of helium (1.37 parts per million of ordinary helium); produced by the beta decay of tritium.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

helium 3

3He
A stable isotope of helium whose nucleus contains two protons and a single neutron. The isotope is polarizable, making it suitable as a gaseous contrast agent for use in magnetic resonance imaging.
See also: helium
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
"Helium-3 and Neon-22 were produced during the formation of the solar system and not by other means," Dygert said.
Even if it turns out that Helium-3 is present on the moon it is likely to be a long time before anyone can collect it.
Helium-3 is much harder to get in a superfluid state than helium-4 because it is made of fermions, particles that cannot occupy the same quantum state.
"There are altogether 15 tons of helium-3 on Earth while, on the moon, the total amount of helium-3 can reach one million to five million tons," he said.
A segmented ionization chamber based on a helium-3 and argon gas mixture with coarse spatial and energy resolution was built for a preliminary fundamental physics measurement of the neutron spin rotation in a liquid helium target [4].
However, there is essentially no source of helium-3 on earth.
Now the Helium-3 discovery means the Moon could provide mankind with another crucial resource.
Thanks to this and to other techniques involving helium-3 and nuclear magnetic properties, temperatures of 1/1,000,000 of a degree above absolute zero have been attained.
Because helium-3 attains that state at a lower temperature than helium-4 does, researchers surmised that there are too few thermal fluctuations to stifle its musical expressions, Hoskinson explains.
Then at the University of Sussex in England, he proposed a mechanism for superfluidity by which atoms in helium-3 behave in a manner similar to the electrons in a superconductor, although with some crucial differences.
The helium-3 isotope indeed isn't radioactive, but it is cosmogenic.
For more than a decade, researchers have been developing a lung-imaging method in which patients inhale magnetically aligned helium-3 gas atoms.