Helicobacter

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Helicobacter

(hel'ĭ-kō-bak'tĕr),
A genus of helical, curved, or straight microaerophilic bacteria with rounded ends and multiple sheathed flagella (unipolar or bipolar and lateral) with terminal bulbs; form nonpigmented, translucent colonies, 1-2 mm in diameter; catalase and oxidase positive. Found in gastric mucosa of primates, including human beings and ferrets; some species are associated with gastric and peptic ulcers and predispose to gastric carcinoma. The type species is H. pylori.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

Hel·i·co·bac·ter

(hel'i-kō-bak'tĕr)
A genus of gram-negative helical, curved, or straight microaerophilic bacteria with rounded ends and numerous sheathed flagella (unipolar or bipolar and lateral) with terminal bulbs. Form nonpigmented, translucent colonies, 1-2 mm in diameter. Catalase and oxidase positive. Found in gastric mucosa of ferrets and primates, including human beings. Some species are associated with gastric and peptic ulcers and predispose to gastric carcinoma. The type species is H. pylori.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

Hel·i·co·bac·ter

(hel'i-kō-bak'tĕr)
Genus of helical, curved, or straight microaerophilic bacteria with rounded ends and multiple sheathed flagella with terminal bulbs. Found in gastric mucosa of primates, including human beings; some species are associated with gastric and peptic ulcers and predispose to gastric carcinoma. The type species is H. pylori.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012