hierarchy

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Related to Heirarchy: Hierarchy of needs

hi·er·ar·chy

(hī'ĕr-ar-kē, hī-rar'kē),
1. Any system of people or things ranked one above the other.
2. In psychology and psychiatry, an organization of habits or concepts in which simpler components are combined to form increasingly complex integrations.
[G. hierarchia, rule or power of the high priest]

hierarchy

(hī′ə-rär′kē, hī′rär′-)
n. pl. hierar·chies
1. A group of persons or things organized into successive ranks or grades with each level subordinate to the one above: a career spent moving up through the military hierarchy.
2. Categorization or arrangement of a group of people or things into such ranks or grades: classification by hierarchy; discounting the effects of hierarchy.
3. A group of animals in which certain members or subgroups dominate or submit to others.

hi·er·ar·chy

(hī'ĕr-ahr-kē)
1. Any system of people or things ranked one above the other.
2. psychology/psychiatry An organization of habits or concepts in which simpler components are combined to form increasingly complex integrations.
[G. hierarchia, rule or power of the high priest]

hierarchy

(in CLASSIFICATION) the system of ranking in a graded order from species to kingdom. see HIGHER CATEGORY.

hi·er·ar·chy

(hī'ĕr-ahr-kē)
Any system of people or things ranked one above the other.
[G. hierarchia, rule or power of the high priest]

hierarchy (hī´ərär´kē),

n 1. system of persons or things ranked one above the other.
n 2. in psychology and psychiatry, an organization of habits or concepts in which simpler components are combined to form increasingly complex integrations.

hierarchy

order of superiority; the arrangement of echelons of command.

court hierarchy
the way in which the courts in a country are arranged so that appeals can be carried from the lower to the higher courts.
References in periodicals archive ?
The accidental states of preservation of centuries-old sources seem to define our heirarchy of artistic values.
at 145 ("[S]peech on public issues occupies the `highest rung of the heirarchy [sic] of First Amendment values'.
In the social heirarchy of the Raj, religious specialists, such as missionaries and clergymen, occupied a rather humble position on the periphery of fashionable European society.
Ernest Beck, a Roman Catholic priest who has defied the church heirarchy to recapture what he sees as the lost dignity of his faith.
Typical dimensions, finishes, and components reduce workload up front and give workspaces an inherent fairness relative to the corporate heirarchy.
He was sensitive, too, to the fact that this so-called Spanish colonial art was in fact the handiwork of Indian and mestizo artisans, working under the direction of the Catholic Church heirarchy.
The latter was defined as "that kind of cooperation among men that is conscious, deliberate purposeful" (Barnard, 1983: 4) and was realized through formal organization, especially heirarchy.
The collections are organized in a generalization/specialization heirarchy (not a tree since each collection may have more than one direct generalization).
The people in these organizations are far more self-reliant and less dependent upon heirarchy and control systems than are people in the traditional organization.
This cast of characters plays a supporting role to her central discussion of how Wordsworth and Coleridge differed in their respective approaches to the speech/writing heirarchy of conventional metaphysics.
Under the terms of the agreement, sci-worx will offer a complete solution by combining sci-worx's strong design expertise and leadership for Sychronous Optical Network/Sychronous Digital Heirarchy (SONET/SDH) and Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM) IP cores with Alcatel's widely licensed silicon proven Ethernet MAC cores.
As per the heirarchy of events, the Masters are the most important tournaments in the professional world of Padel Tennis.