hierarchy

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Related to Heirarchical: Hierarchical database, Hierarchical model

hi·er·ar·chy

(hī'ĕr-ar-kē, hī-rar'kē),
1. Any system of people or things ranked one above the other.
2. In psychology and psychiatry, an organization of habits or concepts in which simpler components are combined to form increasingly complex integrations.
[G. hierarchia, rule or power of the high priest]

hierarchy

(hī′ə-rär′kē, hī′rär′-)
n. pl. hierar·chies
1. A group of persons or things organized into successive ranks or grades with each level subordinate to the one above: a career spent moving up through the military hierarchy.
2. Categorization or arrangement of a group of people or things into such ranks or grades: classification by hierarchy; discounting the effects of hierarchy.
3. A group of animals in which certain members or subgroups dominate or submit to others.

hi·er·ar·chy

(hī'ĕr-ahr-kē)
1. Any system of people or things ranked one above the other.
2. psychology/psychiatry An organization of habits or concepts in which simpler components are combined to form increasingly complex integrations.
[G. hierarchia, rule or power of the high priest]

hierarchy

(in CLASSIFICATION) the system of ranking in a graded order from species to kingdom. see HIGHER CATEGORY.

hi·er·ar·chy

(hī'ĕr-ahr-kē)
Any system of people or things ranked one above the other.
[G. hierarchia, rule or power of the high priest]
References in periodicals archive ?
However, for many uses we like the simple, heirarchical structure of the gopher and the ease of expanding it and maintaining it.
(Kooiman 1989:44-45).(22) The Serampore trio themselves became staunch supporters of the heirarchical establishment imported by their imperially-minded countrymen.
Any "cost" that may be associated with providing satisfactory promotion opportunities (e.g., increased performance monitoring costs, increased pay and benefits for individuals who are promoted and greater complexity due to the increased heirarchical structure required to support promotions) should be judged in relation to the benefits possible for increased job satisfaction and reduced turnover intentions.
Abstracting relational and heirarchical data with a semantic data model.
Infallible propositions have been deemed a suitable foundation for knowledge, whose structure is heirarchical: fallible beliefs being inferred from (based on) secure ones.