hierarchy

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Related to Heirarchical: Hierarchical database, Hierarchical model

hi·er·ar·chy

(hī'ĕr-ar-kē, hī-rar'kē),
1. Any system of people or things ranked one above the other.
2. In psychology and psychiatry, an organization of habits or concepts in which simpler components are combined to form increasingly complex integrations.
[G. hierarchia, rule or power of the high priest]

hierarchy

(hī′ə-rär′kē, hī′rär′-)
n. pl. hierar·chies
1. A group of persons or things organized into successive ranks or grades with each level subordinate to the one above: a career spent moving up through the military hierarchy.
2. Categorization or arrangement of a group of people or things into such ranks or grades: classification by hierarchy; discounting the effects of hierarchy.
3. A group of animals in which certain members or subgroups dominate or submit to others.

hi·er·ar·chy

(hī'ĕr-ahr-kē)
1. Any system of people or things ranked one above the other.
2. psychology/psychiatry An organization of habits or concepts in which simpler components are combined to form increasingly complex integrations.
[G. hierarchia, rule or power of the high priest]

hierarchy

(in CLASSIFICATION) the system of ranking in a graded order from species to kingdom. see HIGHER CATEGORY.

hi·er·ar·chy

(hī'ĕr-ahr-kē)
Any system of people or things ranked one above the other.
[G. hierarchia, rule or power of the high priest]

hierarchy (hī´ərär´kē),

n 1. system of persons or things ranked one above the other.
n 2. in psychology and psychiatry, an organization of habits or concepts in which simpler components are combined to form increasingly complex integrations.

hierarchy

order of superiority; the arrangement of echelons of command.

court hierarchy
the way in which the courts in a country are arranged so that appeals can be carried from the lower to the higher courts.
References in periodicals archive ?
The expenditure data are tabulated using a heirarchical system with three principal levels of aggregation.
Having the ability to access and organize applications on your Palm device using either desktop-like heirarchical menus and Drag and Drop or the standard Palm "tap and scroll" gives GoBar users the best of both worlds," continued Polzine.
As with the structural equivalence data, Johnson's (1967) heirarchical clustering (diameter method) was applied to the unreversed organizational ptoximity matrix to identify overall organizational positions.
There are several reasons why a highly specific asset is more likely to be acquired through heirarchical coordination than through market coordination [41, 43, 44].
The claims in this patent provide significant protection for the heirarchical memory implementation of stacks for microprocessors.
Monday announced a new integrated Hierarchical Storage Management (HSM) solution that takes advantage of the revolutionary features of IBM's Magstar tape technology and the industry leading Metior software from Automated Network Technologies (ANT), creating a new standard in Heirarchical Storage Management functionality in automated tape libraries.