delta

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delta

 [del´tah]
1. the fourth letter of the Greek alphabet, Δ or δ; used in chemical names to denote the fourth of a series of isomeric compounds or the carbon atom fourth from the carboxyl group, or to denote the fourth of any series.
2. a triangular area.

Δ

1. Fourth letter of the Greek alphabet, delta.
2. In chemistry, denotes a double bond, usually with a superscript to indicate position in a chain (Δ5), application of heat in a reaction (A B), absence of heat treatment (), distance between two atoms in a molecule, or position of a substituent located on the fourth atom from the carboxyl or other primary functional group (δ); change (Δ); thickness (δ); chemical shift in NMR (δ).
3. anatomy a triangular surface.

del·ta (Δ),

(del'tă),
1. Fourth letter of the Greek alphabet, Δ (capital), δ (lower case).

δ

/δ/ (delta, the fourth letter of the Greek alphabet) heavy chain of IgD; δ chain of hemoglobin.

delta

/del·ta/ (delt´ah)
1. the fourth letter of the Greek alphabet; see also δ-.
2. a triangular area.

delta

[del′tə]
Δ, δ, fourth letter of the Greek alphabet.

YY1

A gene on chromosome 14q that encodes a ubiquitous transcription factor belonging to the GLI-Kruppel class of zinc finger proteins, which directs histone deacetylases or histone acetyltransferases to myriad promoters activating or repressing their activity, implicating histone modification in YY1 activity.

δ,

Δ
Abbreviation for delta; diopter.

del·ta

(Δ, δ) (del'tă)
1. Fourth letter of the Greek alphabet.
2. chemistry A double bond, usually with a superscript to indicate position in a chain (Δ5); application of heat in a reaction (A B); absence of heat treatment (Δ); distance between two atoms in a molecule, or position of a substituent located on the fourth atom from the carboxyl or other primary functional group (δ); change (Δ); thickness (δ); chemical shift in NMR (δ).
3. anatomy A triangular surface.

delta,

n a Greek letter symbolized by upper case Δ or lower case δ. See also Greek letters.

Δ

, δ
1. Fourth letter of the Greek alphabet, delta.
2. anatomy a triangular surface.

delta

1. the fourth letter of the Greek alphabet, Δ or δ; used in chemical names to denote the fourth of a series of isomeric compounds or the carbon atom fourth from the carboxyl group, or to denote the fourth of any series.
2. a triangular area.

delta T lymphocyte
see T lymphocyte.
References in periodicals archive ?
the risk-minimising hedge ratio equals the slope coefficient of an Ordinary Least Squares (OLS) regression of spot price changes (dependent variable) on futures price changes (independent variable).
Our derivation of a new three-component optimum risk-return hedge ratio is based upon the optimality condition at which the firm's marginal cost of hedging equals its marginal benefit of hedging at the optimum.
The reported hedge ratios may vary significantly, depending on Fortum's actions on the electricity derivatives markets.
see Johnson, 2008) "The hedge analysis across all months gave an optimal hedge ratio of-1.
Ratings could be lowered if losses from loan repurchases significantly exceed operating cash flows and other liquidity sources; mortgage origination decline causes the company's natural hedge ratio to materially worsen; or the company is unable to maintain adequate covenant cushion under its debt agreements, including the bank revolving credit facility.
Our optimization results show that there exists a negative relation between hedge ratio and longevity hedge cost.
We also examine the coefficient on the hedge ratio variable across different time periods depending upon the credit rating environment.
Benninga, Simon, Rafael Eldor, and Itzhak Zilcha, "The Optimal Hedge Ratio in Unbiased Futures Markets.
It is surprising that so many practitioners believe this approach yields the optimal hedge ratio, considering the fact that it is relatively easy to show that this approach is not equivalent to hedging the profit/loss resulting from changes in underlying mortgage prices.
Ratings could be lowered if losses from loan put-backs significantly exceed operating cash flows and other liquidity sources; mortgage origination decline causes the company's natural hedge ratio to materially worsen; or the company is unable to extend the unsecured bank revolver beyond its scheduled maturity.
In other words: how confident are we in a stated hedge effectiveness, hedge ratio or price?