Heberden

Heb·er·den

(hē'bĕr-dĕn),
William, English physician, 1710-1801. See: Heberden angina, Heberden nodes, Rougnon-Heberden disease.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
The 73-year-old described how he fell for Valerie Heberden, the puppeteer who operated George, as soon as he saw her.
(1) This form of angina has been well known for more than 200 years since its description by Heberden, and its pathogenesis has been explained by increased myocardial oxygen demand in the presence of fixed organic stenosis of the epicardial coronary arteries.
For example, OA of the fingers affects distal interphalangeal joints and is associated with Heberden's nodes, while RA more commonly affects MCP and PIP joints.
Other symptoms predictive of later OA on MRI included a history of knee injury (OR, 2.52), pain on palpation (OR, 2.30) or during activity (OR, 2.13), the feeling of the knee giving way (OR, 2.13), joint line tenderness (OR, 2.04), crepitus (or grating sounds or sensations; OR, 1.85), and Heberden's nodes (OR, 1.67).
Other signs and symptoms predictive of later OA on MRI included a history of knee injury (OR, 2.52), pain on palpation (OR, 2.30) or during activity (OR, 2.13), the feeling of the knee giving way (OR, 2.13), joint line tenderness (OR, 2.04), crepitus (or grating sounds or sensations; OR, 1.85), and Heberden's nodes (OR, 1.67).
In the early 1800s, William Heberden, a physician in London, was the first to report anaphylactoid purpura, finding it in a 5-year-old boy with hematuria, abdominal pain, arthralgia and a skin rash (l).
Heberden, ed., Brasenose College Register 1509-1909, 2 vols (Oxford: Blackwell, 1909), I, 113, 115.
Bony enlargements such as Bouchard's nodes on the PIP joints and Heberden's nodes on the distal interphalangeal are commonly found in hand OA.
She had bilateral ulnar deviation with multiple Heberden's and Bouchard's nodes in the distal and proximal interphalangeal joints, respectively.