hyperthermia

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hyperthermia

 [hi″per-ther´me-ah]
1. greatly increased temperature; see also fever. Called also hyperpyrexia. adj., adj hyperther´mal, hyperther´mic.
2. a nursing diagnosis accepted by the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association, defined as the state in which an individual's body temperature is elevated above his or her normal range.
malignant hyperthermia a syndrome affecting patients undergoing general anesthesia, marked by rapid rise in body temperature, signs of increased muscle metabolism, and usually rigidity. The sensitivity is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait.

hy·per·ther·mi·a

(hī-per-ther'mē-ă),
Therapeutically or iatrogenically induced hyperpyrexia.
[hyper- + G. thermē, heat]

hyperthermia

(hī′pər-thûr′mē-ə)
n.
Unusually high body temperature.

hy′per·ther′mal adj.

hyperthermia

Hyperpyrexia Mainstream medicine A condition defined as a corporal temperature of ≥ 42ºC; the body defends itself with peripheral vasodilation–↓ effective volume, resulting in ↑ pulse rate–a response to perceived blood loss, ↓ cardiac efficiency, hypoxia, ↑ permeability of cell membranes with ↑ potassium, followed by cardiac failure. See Malignant hyperthermia Oncology A type of treatment in which tissue is exposed to high temperatures to damage and kill CA cells, or ↑ CA cell sensitivity to RT and chemotherapy. See Induced hyperthermia, Malignant hyperthermia.

hy·per·ther·mi·a

(hī'pĕr-thĕr'mē-ă, hīpĕr-thĕrmē-ă)
Hyperpyrexia, often (but not necessarily) induced therapeutically; denotes bodily state with core body temperature significantly above 98.6°F (37°C); term may indicate temperature sufficiently elevated to cause illness.
[hyper- + G. thermē, heat]

hyperthermia

See HYPERPYREXIA, MALIGNANT HYPERTHERMIA.

hy·per·ther·mi·a

(hī'pĕr-thĕr'mē-ă)
Therapeutically or iatrogenically induced hyperpyrexia.
[hyper- + G. thermē, heat]
References in periodicals archive ?
Other than heat-related deaths, annual coastal flooding-related deaths will rise from six to 233 by the end of the century.
Finally, we calculate future heat-related deaths by combining the derived temperature-mortality relationships and population scenarios with the downscaled temperature projections from the 33 global climate models (GCMs) and the two Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs), RCP4.5 and RCP8.5, developed in support of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC)'s Fifth Assessment Report (AR5) (IPCC 2013).
The simulations showed that 70 percent of heat-related deaths in central Paris during the heatwave and 20 percent in Greater London could be attributed to climate change.
Researchers calculated that 506 out of 735 heat-related deaths recorded that summer in Paris - the hottest city - were due to global warming.
They found that human-induced climate change increased the risk of heat-related deaths by around 70 per cent in central Paris and 20 per cent in London.
KE spokesperson negated the allegations made by provincial ministers where they blamed the power utility for heat-related deaths in Karachi by stating, Ministers and government are fond of pointing fingers at KE for every negative scenario prevalent in the city.
According to PDMA figures, 163 heat-related deaths were reported from Civil Hospital, 338 JPMC, 68 SG Qatar Hospital, 190 Abbasi Shaheed Hospital, 29 Sindh Government Hospital (SGH) New Karachi Hospital, 06 SGH Liaquatabad Hospital and 07 from SGH Korangi.
The death toll is still being tallied, and many heat-related deaths will be recognised only after the fact.
A new report of heat-related deaths issued by George Washington University and John Hopkins University found, not surprisingly, that those employed in outdoor settings are the most susceptible to heat-induced death and disability.
This heat intolerance has led to an increase in heat-related deaths during heat waves.
A less intense heat wave in August 2007 resulted in 13 fatalities, while the majority of those treated at hospitals were of working age (26-50) and were working outside when they experienced heat stress (Pence & Stefkovich, 2008), suggesting the demographics of heat-related deaths may be changing.