heartworm

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Di·ro·fi·la·ri·a im·'mi·tis

a species of filarial worms; primary hosts are dogs and other canids in tropical, subtropical and temperate climates, adult worms are found chiefly in the right ventricle and pulmonary arteries of dogs; sometimes a serious pathogen of racing and show dogs, especially in the southern U.S. where mosquito vectors are most common; Dirofilaria immitis and its canine host have been used to test chemotherapeutic agents, and an extract of Dirofilaria immitis may be used as a nonspecific intradermal antigen in the diagnosis of human filariasis and in complement-fixation tests.
See also: Dipetalonema reconditum.
Synonym(s): heartworm

heartworm

/heart·worm/ (hahrt´wurm) an individual of the species Dirofilaria immitis.

heartworm

(härt′wûrm′)
n.
1. A parasitic filarial worm (Dirofilaria immitis) that is transmitted by mosquitoes and infects the pulmonary arteries and often the right side of the heart of dogs and other canids and sometimes other mammals, including cats.
2. The condition resulting from infection with heartworms, characterized by respiratory symptoms and fatigue.

heartworm

the common name for dirofilariaimmitis.
Enlarge picture
Heartworms. By permission from Darke P, Kelly DF, Bonagura JD, Color Atlas of Veterinary Cardiology, Mosby, 1995

heartworm dermatitis
cutaneous dirofilariasis; a variety of skin lesions have been seen in dogs infested by Dirofilaria immitis, including hypersensitivity reactions, pyogranulomas and seborrheic dermatitis.
heartworm disease
the syndrome of pulmonary artery disease with hypertension, heart failure (primarily cor pulmonale), and occasionally liver failure and interstitial, tubular and glomerular renal lesions caused by infestation by Dirofilaria immitis. Many species may be infected, but dogs are most commonly affected by chronic cough, weight loss and ultimately congestive heart failure. Infestation by the parasite, and the disease, can be prevented with appropriate prophylactic chemotherapy. Called also dirofilariasis. See also occult heartworm infection, caval syndrome.
References in periodicals archive ?
Because the level of medication is higher than was needed in the initial approvals for 100 percent efficacy, it's possible that Interceptor may continue to be more effective against non-resistant strains of heartworms.
Unfortunately, accurate diagnosis can sometimes be difficult, since negative antigen and antibodies don't automatically rule out the presence of heartworms.
In November 2004; the FDA's Center for Veterinary Medicine sent Merial a letter, stating "there were numerous reports of ineffectiveness for heartworm prevention despite 'Heartgard Plus' being used according to the label directions.
Those "thrills" were the result of sizeable heartworms lounging in their heart valves.
He says that he first began noticing an increase in the number of dogs in his clinic who tested positive for heartworms despite being on year-round heartworm preventatives in 2006.
The Department of Infectious Diseases at University of Georgia's College of Veterinary Medicine confirmed that the heartworms were drug-resistant and named the strain "Metairie-2014.
3) Heartworms have never been demonstrated in the right ventricle in living dogs, but are commonly found lodged there at autopsy as postmortem artifacts.
I'm about to tell you something that I haven't ever confessed in these pages, not even hinted at it in 17 years: I once was so pig-ignorant about dog care that I allowed my dog - my best friend at the time, my stalwart, beloved Border Collie Rupert, to develop heartworm disease.
Year-round heartworm preventative programs also help dog owners with compliance.
One dog cannot give heartworms to another dog because only the bite of an infected mosquito passes on this parasite.
Canine heartworm disease caused by the filarial nematode, Dirofilaria immitis is a major potentially life-threatening disease of dogs with worldwide distribution and global significance.
The continuous feeding of fleas on dogs may result in a hypersensitivity skin disorder known as flea allergy dermatitis, while deer ticks may transmit Lyme disease and mosquitoes are a major carrier of canine heartworms.