heart-lung transplant


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heart-lung transplant

The insertion of a donated heart with its associated lungs, connected as a unit, into the chest of a patient with severe destructive heart and lung disease. The operation involves fewer major connections than a heart transplant, but immunological reactions may be greater and the connection to the windpipe (trachea) may cause problems. A common rejection reaction is a severe inflammation of the small bronchi, called obliterative bronchiolitis. Even so, the results are remarkable and about 70' of patients are alive and well 2 years after the operation.
References in periodicals archive ?
After people receive heart-lung transplants two-thirds will survive for a year and almost as many for two years.
Additionally, evidence suggests that the forced expiratory flow (FEF25-75) decreases before the FEV1 in most bilateral and heart-lung transplant recipients with OB.
Graft rejection in the heart-lung transplant recipient can include both cardiac as well as pulmonary symptoms.
Someone may walk past a lung or heart-lung transplant recipient at the mall, sit next to one in a restaurant or movie theater, or attend a religious or sporting event with one, and not realize what he or she has experienced.
In the spring of 2000, doctors recommended that she receive a heart-lung transplant, but the family could not afford the $500,000 operation, and they did not qualify for Medicaid, given their status as illegal immigrants.
Before long, the entire nation knew how the Santillans' dream of a heart-lung transplant had been realized with the help of a strange-turned-benefactor, only to be shattered by a shockingly simple oversight.
A TEENAGE girl underwent a second heart-lung transplant yesterday, two weeks after a botched operation with organs of the wrong blood type left her near death.
However, Vivienne Nathanson, head of science and ethics at the British Medical Association, said: "We would find it unacceptable for doctors to discount people with Down's Syndrome for a heart-lung transplant just because they have this disorder."
Take the case of Sandra Jensen, a thirty-five-year-old woman with Down syndrome who needed a heart-lung transplant. Jensen had lived on her own and held a job for years.
The first heart-lung transplant was performed in this country in 1981.
Adam Parker from Spital, Wirral was back home with his family after a lifesaving heart-lung transplant operation.