headgear

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head·gear

(hed'gēr),
A removable extraoral appliance used as a source of traction to apply force to the teeth and jaws.

headgear

(hĕd′gîr′)
n.
An orthodontic brace extending around the head from one side of the mouth to the other, used to reposition the teeth or to restrict the growth of the upper jaw.

headgear

A generic term for a device worn on the head to minimise the effect of external forces.

head·gear

(hed'gēr)
Removable extraoral appliance used to apply force to teeth and jaws.
References in periodicals archive ?
Singer Karen O arrived at the Radio 1-NME Stage at Balado in a colourful Native Americanstyle headress and cloak.
And she has worn her hair quite casually and opted not to wear a headress or veil, so it is not quite as formal."WEDDING dress designer Nicola Henderson said:
We were welcomed with a traditional 'sing-sing'--men and women dressed in tapa cloth and spectacular feathered headresses dancing to the beat of kundu drums and shouting calls of 'Oro Kaiva, Oro Kaiva' (welcome).
Wilkinson (Oxford, 1931), 100; men shaved and the women put in their best headresses; the mythical James Revel in his account also describes being cleaned up and shaved, John Melville Jennings, "The Poor Unhappy Transported Felon's Sorrowful Account of His Fourteen Years Transportation in America," Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, 56 (1948), 180-94, 190.
These women are paired together in portraits that honor their importance as cultural leaders and celebrate their desire to praise the Lord each Sunday, crowned with stunning headresses of fur, felt, or straw, which are adorned with feathers, artificial flowers, or clusters of sparkling sequins and rhinestones.
Remnants of this historical heritage are still seen in Malay court life, instilling respect for the hierarchy of the royal family; elaborate wedding ceremonies featuring ornate clothing and exotic, sometimes golden, headresses; and the wayang kulit (shadow play) theater, based on the great Hindu epics of the Mahabharata and Ramayana.
The two pages wore navy and white costumes like little Knights of the Garter, and the angelic-looking bridesmaids were dressed in white frocks and matching capes with elaborate plumed headresses.