Hayflick limit


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Hay·flick lim·'it

(hā'flik),
the limit of human cell division in subcultures; such cells typically divide only about 50 times before dying out.

Hay·flick lim·it

(hā'flik lim'it)
The limit of human cell division in subcultures; such cells typically divide only about 50 times before dying out.

Hayflick,

Leonard, U.S. microbiologist, 1928–.
Hayflick limit - the limit of human cell division in subcultures.
References in periodicals archive ?
Hayflick explains the process of the "Hayflick limit," and reveals the origin of the term: "(There is) a period when the cells have stopped dividing, (which) people generally have called...
This limit is called the Hayflick limit (after the scientist who discovered it).This gradual telomere shortening occurs over a period of time and results in cellular aging.
The Hayflick limit states that cells can only undergo a limited number of divisions before dying.
This phenomenon is known as the Hayflick limit, after Leonard Hayflick, who with Paul Moorhead described it in 1961 while at the Wistar Institute in Philadelphia.