Hayflick

Hay·flick

(hā'flik),
Leonard, 20th-century U.S. microbiologist. See: Hayflick limit.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
In a pre-Shimmer flashback, Lena explains the notion to her husband: 'You take a cell, circumvent the Hayflick limit, you can prevent senescence [...] It means the cell doesn't grow old; it becomes immortal.' Sure sounds like science fiction, but this isn't entirely outside the realm of possibility.
In the case of milk samples, 2mL was sterilized using a syringe coupled with a membrane filter (0.45[micro]M), and 100[micro]L of the filtrate was diluted to concentrations of [10.sup.-1] to [10.sup.-5] and inoculated onto liquid and solid modified Hayflick's medium.
As demonstrated by Leonard Hayflick a half-century ago, human cells have a limited replicative lifespan, with older cells reaching this limit sooner than younger cells.
The term cellular senescence was used in 1961 for the first time by Hayflick and Moorhead [1], to define the mechanism determining the irreversible loss of the proliferative activity of human somatic cells [1].
Not long ago, the microbiologist Leonard Hayflick was asked what had changed since he began his career 55 years ago.
But it focuses primarily on three characters: Leonard Hayflick, a brilliant but stubborn cell culturist; Stanley Plotkin, a physician bent on discovering a rubella vaccine in time to stave off an impending epidemic; and Hilary Koprowski, their colorful, visionary boss and head of the Wistar Institute in Philadelphia.
"Vaccination is a particularly important issue to think about now, given the rise of an anti-vaccine movement that has the potential to reverse the health gains achieved through one of the most powerful interventions in medical history," said study co-author Leonard Hayflick, PhD, who developed WI-38, in a news release.
The history of senescence starts with the discovery of the Hayflick limit in 1961.
"Vaccination is a particularly important issue to think about now, given the rise of an anti-vaccine movement that has the potential to reverse the health gains achieved through one of the most powerful interventions in medical history," co-author Leonard Hayflick, from the University of California, San Francisco, said in (https://news.uic.edu/ten-million-lives-saved-by-1962-breakthrough-study-says) a statement from the University of Illinois at Chicago, both institutions that worked on the project.