Hayflick

Hay·flick

(hā'flik),
Leonard, 20th-century U.S. microbiologist. See: Hayflick limit.
References in periodicals archive ?
In a pre-Shimmer flashback, Lena explains the notion to her husband: 'You take a cell, circumvent the Hayflick limit, you can prevent senescence [...] It means the cell doesn't grow old; it becomes immortal.' Sure sounds like science fiction, but this isn't entirely outside the realm of possibility.
In the case of milk samples, 2mL was sterilized using a syringe coupled with a membrane filter (0.45[micro]M), and 100[micro]L of the filtrate was diluted to concentrations of [10.sup.-1] to [10.sup.-5] and inoculated onto liquid and solid modified Hayflick's medium.
As demonstrated by Leonard Hayflick a half-century ago, human cells have a limited replicative lifespan, with older cells reaching this limit sooner than younger cells.
El analisis de la muestra arrojo que la division celular excedia el limite de Hayflick (17) al replicarse al infinito, ademas de que la adaptabilidad de las celulas a distintos medios las hacia idoneas para investigaciones biomedicas, derivando en el cultivo de la primera linea celular HeLa.
The term cellular senescence was used in 1961 for the first time by Hayflick and Moorhead [1], to define the mechanism determining the irreversible loss of the proliferative activity of human somatic cells [1].
Not long ago, the microbiologist Leonard Hayflick was asked what had changed since he began his career 55 years ago.
Past recipients include Professor Leonard Hayflick, who discovered the Hayflick limit to cell division, and Emeritus Professor of the Newcastle University Institute for Ageing, Professor Tom Kirkwood CBE who proposed the evolutionary concept of disposable soma.
But it focuses primarily on three characters: Leonard Hayflick, a brilliant but stubborn cell culturist; Stanley Plotkin, a physician bent on discovering a rubella vaccine in time to stave off an impending epidemic; and Hilary Koprowski, their colorful, visionary boss and head of the Wistar Institute in Philadelphia.
"Vaccination is a particularly important issue to think about now, given the rise of an anti-vaccine movement that has the potential to reverse the health gains achieved through one of the most powerful interventions in medical history," said study co-author Leonard Hayflick, PhD, who developed WI-38, in a news release.
The history of senescence starts with the discovery of the Hayflick limit in 1961.
"Vaccination is a particularly important issue to think about now, given the rise of an anti-vaccine movement that has the potential to reverse the health gains achieved through one of the most powerful interventions in medical history," co-author Leonard Hayflick, from the University of California, San Francisco, said in (https://news.uic.edu/ten-million-lives-saved-by-1962-breakthrough-study-says) a statement from the University of Illinois at Chicago, both institutions that worked on the project.