Hawthorne effect

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effect

 [ĕ-fekt´]
a result produced by an action.
additive effect the combined effect produced by the action of two or more agents, being equal to the sum of their separate effects.
adverse effect a symptom produced by a drug or therapy that is injurious to the patient.
Bainbridge effect Bainbridge reflex.
Bohr effect decreased affinity of hemoglobin for oxygen caused by an increase of carbon dioxide; the oxyhemoglobin dissociation curve is displaced to the right because of higher partial pressure of carbon dioxide and lower pH. See also Haldane effect.
The Bohr effect causing a shift to the right in the oxyhemoglobin dissociation curve.
Crabtree effect the inhibition of oxygen consumption on the addition of glucose to tissues or microorganisms having a high rate of aerobic glycolysis; the converse of the Pasteur effect.
cumulative effect the action of a drug or treatment resulting from repeated use.
Doppler effect see doppler effect.
experimenter e's demand characteristics.
extrapyramidal e's the side effects caused by neuroleptic medications, including dystonias, parkinsonism, akathisia, and tardive dyskinesia.
Haldane effect increased oxygenation of hemoglobin promotes dissociation of carbon dioxide; see also Bohr effect.
Hawthorne effect a psychological response in which the subjects in a research study change their behavior simply because they are subjects in a study, not because of the research treatment.
heel effect variation in x-ray beam intensity and projected focal spot size along the long axis of the x-ray tube from cathode to anode.
parallax effect the position of the image on each emulsion of dual emulsion film; it is accentuated by tube-angled x-ray techniques.
Pasteur effect the decrease in the rate of glycolysis and the suppression of lactate accumulation by tissues or microorganisms in the presence of oxygen.
photoelectric effect ejection of electrons from matter as a result of interaction with photons from high frequency electromagnetic radiation, such as x-rays; the ejected electrons may be energetic enough to ionize multiple additional atoms.
placebo effect the total of all nonspecific effects, both good and adverse, of treatment; it refers primarily to psychological and psychophysiological effects associated with the caregiver-patient relationship and the patient's expectations and apprehensions concerning the treatment. See also placebo.
position effect in genetics, the changed effect produced by alteration of the relative positions of various genes on the chromosomes.
pressure effect the sum of the changes that are due to obstruction of tissue drainage by pressure.
proarrhythmic effect any new, more advanced form of arrhythmia caused by an antiarrhythmic agent, especially those that produce hemodynamically important symptoms. These arrhythmias occur less than 30 days after initiation of treatment and are not due to a new event such as acute myocardial infarction or hypokalemia.
side effect a consequence other than that for which an agent is used, especially an adverse effect on another organ system.
Somogyi effect see somogyi effect.

Haw·thorne ef·fect

(haw'thōrn),
the effect (usually positive or beneficial) of being under study, on the people being studied; their knowledge of the study often influences their behavior.
[city in Illinois; site of the Western Electric plant]
A beneficial effect that health care providers have on workers in most settings when an interest is shown in the workers’ well-being and performance, irrespective of whether or not the intervention was a good one

Hawthorne effect

Psychology A beneficial effect that health care providers have on workers in most settings when an interest is shown in the workers' well-being. See Halo effect, Placebo effect, Placebo response. Cf Nocebo.

Haw·thorne ef·fect

(haw'thōrn e-fekt')
Reaction (usually positive or beneficial) of being under study, on the people being studied; their knowledge of the study often influences their behavior.
[city in Illinois]
References in periodicals archive ?
Yet, as found in the Hawthorne studies, employee participation is a key to breaking through these old patterns.
As the Hawthorne studies showed, employees are more understanding of and committed to changes they have assisted in creating.
Mapping Hawthorne studies in this seminal period, we find that Hawthorne studies in China began from scratch in the 1910s and developed quickly in the following three decades.
However, it is worth noting that in this period Hawthorne studies were still trudging forward.
Besides translations of Hawthorne's works, Hawthorne studies almost came to a halt in the frozen period.
Compared with the first period, Hawthorne studies stagnated and declined during this period.
Since 1979, Hawthorne studies have flowered in China, with scholars taking multiple approaches to his work.
With the development of Hawthorne studies, there was also a natural turn from "What does Hawthorne say?" to "How does Hawthorne say it?," and the second aspect of Hawthorne studies in this period is further discussion of Hawthorne's writing technique and the genre of his novels.
This is the third aspect of Hawthorne studies in the flowering period.
In addition, four monographs on Hawthorne (14) have been produced, which indicates great progress in Hawthorne studies. Since 1910, Hawthorne has gradually come to enjoy a popular acclaim that he might have never expected in China, and Chinese scholars have made great achievements in Hawthorne study.
(2) Hawthorne Studies since the 1990s more or less echo this idea.