harvestmen


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harvestmen

the order Opiliones (Arachnida) which live in leaf litter and have the appearance of long-legged spiders, though the prosoma and opisthosoma are fused into a single structure.

harvestmen

arachnids of the order Opiliones (or Phalangida) with very long legs and small round bodies. Predatory and carnivorous but not venomous. Called also daddy-long-legs.
References in periodicals archive ?
Terrestrial arthropods like harvestmen have a sparse fossil record because their exoskeletons don't preserve well.
Cytogenetic studies of South American harvestmen were performed in only eight species of the family Gonyleptidae Sundevall (Laniatores) from Brazil, which showed the highest chromosome numbers of the order (Oliveira et al.
Most descriptions of courtship in harvestmen of the suborder Laniatores lack detailed information, such as which parts of the female body are touched by the male.
Insect larvae (including those of moths, Lepidoptera), centipedes (Chilopoda), spiders (Araneae), ants (Hymenoptera: Formicidae), and harvestmen (Phalangida) contributed most to the diet of the species.
2012: Phylogenomic resolution of paleozoic divergences in harvestmen (Arachnida, Opiliones) via analysis of next-generation transcriptome data.
Guffey C (1999) Cost associated with leg autotomy in the harvestmen Leiobunum nigripes and Leiobunum vittatum (Arachnida: Opiliones).
Some harvestmen records (Arachnida: Opiliones) from Nigde Province of Turkey.
A morphometrics-based phylogeny of the temperate Gondwanan mite harvestmen (Opiliones, Cyphophthalmi, Pettalidae).
Alternatively this double peak of activity might also correspond to the same single generation of harvestmen that become active only under the most favorable conditions with optimum temperatures and humidity (i.
Defenses of harvestmen (Arachnida: Opiliones): The reasons behind their survival success.
Bechstein's bats are medium- sized with long, broad ears that help when feeding on "noisy" arthropods including moths, crickets, harvestmen, earwigs, ground beetles and spiders; the bats often pick these insects off vegetation.
There are more than 600 species of spiders in Britain, and a couple of dozen of their close cousins the harvestmen - so-called because they are mostly seen in late summer and autumn.