Harvard criteria

A series of 4 parameters delineated by the Harvard Medical School ad hoc committee for irreversible coma
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

Harvard criteria

A series of 4 parameters delineated by the the Harvard Medical School ad hoc committee for irreversible coma
Harvard criteria for brain death
• Unreceptivity and unresponsiveness
• No movement or breathing
• No reflexes
• Flat electroencephalogram (confirmatory)
In addition, the following must be present
• Body temperature ≥32º C
• Absence of CNS depressants
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
He declares this a serious omission, most notably because three years after publication of the Harvard Criteria in the Journal of the American Medical Association, University of Minnesota physicians measured positive EEG readings in five of nine patients for whom the first three Harvard criteria--today's standard for brain death-applied.
That difference of opinion is partly responsible for New Jersey being the only state with statutory recognition of a religious objection to the Harvard criteria. The most recent New York regulation calls for "reasonable accommodation" of those with religious objections, and lays out the process of extensive testing.
Let's skip ahead to 1968, and to the target of Teresi's unsparing vituperation: a Harvard Medical School committee--comprised of thirteen men, most of them physicians--that declared that irreversible coma (or brain death) was, to quote the committee, "a criterion for death." Teresi believes that the committees pronouncement, which became extremely influential throughout the country, was profoundly misguided and immoral: "the Harvard criteria predict that the patient will die.
At about the same time, in 1968, medical researchers published the Harvard Criteria for Irreversible Coma.
As we noted above, the Harvard criteria aim at protecting not only brain-damaged patients, but also their relatives, doctors, and even other patients; in addition, the criteria allow doctors to obtain healthier organs for transplantation than would be otherwise possible.

Full browser ?