sphere

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sphere

 [sfēr]
a three dimensional round body; called also globus. adj., adj spher´ical.
attraction sphere centrosome.
segmentation sphere
1. morula.

sphere

(sfēr),
A ball or globular body.
[G. sphaira]

sphere

(sfēr)
A ball or globular body.
[G. sphaira]

sphere 

A term commonly used to denote the spherical component of a prescription or of the power of a lens, or even a spherical lens. See spherical lens; prescription.
far point sphere The imaginary spherical surface on which lie the far points of accommodation for all directions of gaze. See far point of accommodation.
near point s . The imaginary spherical surface on which lie the near points of accommodation for all directions of gaze. See near point of accommodation.
References in periodicals archive ?
His version of the musical unveiling of Being is equally reminiscent of the Pythagorean harmony of the spheres, and, once again, does not sound like anything anyone has ever heard before.
For more information contact Harmony Of The Spheres Publications.
Kepler (1571-1630) was convinced that the spheres containing the orbits of the planets are separated by intervals that correspond to the relative length of strings that produce consonant tones, what he called the "harmonices mundi" or the "harmony of the spheres."
In "The Harmony of the Spheres," the narrator tries to explain his fascination with the occult: "In that world of magic and power there seemed to exist the kind of fusion of world views, European Amerindian Oriental Levantine, in which I desperately wanted to believe." In the final story, "Courter," the narrator observes, "I, too, have ropes around my neck, I have them to this day, pulling me this way and that, East and West, the nooses tightening, commanding, choose, choose.
The plan of the book is a simple chronological one, from a first chapter on the harmony of the spheres in the Enlightenment (Newton, Castel, Eckartshausen, Goethe, Rameau, Briseux), through 'Pythagoras in Egypt and China' (Roussier, Laborde, Vismes du Valgay, Villoteau), then Fabre d'Olivet, Fourier and his followers, Hoene Wronski and his followers (notably Durutte and Charles Henry), to the Pythagoreans of the mid nineteenth century (Lacuria, Kastner, Chomet, Pontecoulant), to Edmond Bailly in the belle epoque, and then on to the 'archeometer' of Saint-Yves d'Alveydre (one of the many and typical keys to unlock the secrets of the universe) and to the encounter of 'speculative music' with modernity.