flax

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flax

a flowering annual herb found in the United States, Canada, and Europe.
uses The seeds are used for constipation and as a source of omega-3 fatty acids.
contraindications It is contraindicated in people with bowel obstruction and dehydration. It is also not recommended during pregnancy and lactation, in children, or in those with known hypersensitivity to this product. It should not be used as a poultice on open wounds.

flax

Herbal medicine
An annual, the oil and seeds of which contain a cyanogenic glycoside, fixed oils (e.g., linoleic and linolenic acids), mucilage and protein; it has been used internally as a laxative and antitussive, and topically to treat burns.

flax,

n Latin name:
Linum usitatissimum; part used: seeds; uses: inflammatory, laxative, anticholesteremic; uses under research: colon disease, eczema, psoriasis, irritable bowel syndrome, diverticulitis, arthritis, allergies, multiple sclerosis, cancer, lupus, menopause, renal cysts, hypertension, and hyperactivity; precautions: pregnancy, lactation, children; patients with digestive blockage or dehydration, diabetes; unripened seeds are poisonous; can cause nausea, diarrhea, and gas, (overuse: weakness, dyspnea, tachypnea, paralysis, convulsions, and death). Also called
linseed, lint bells, linen flax, and
linum.
Enlarge picture
Flax.

flax

Linum usitatissimum (cultivated flax, linseed) and L. catharticum (purging flax).

dwarf bay flax
daphnemezereum.
References in periodicals archive ?
The muka, as the most important element in the harakeke and woven mahi, represents the value and often unseen work of health staff.
This has, to a large extent been located around models of wellbeing, based on customary values, beliefs and practices, including Te Whare Tapa Wha, Te Wheke, Paiheretia, Poutama, Pa Harakeke and Te Pae Mahutonga (summarised in Durie, 2001).
Hutia te rito o te harakeke, Kei hea te komako e ko, Ki mai koe ki au He aha te mea nui o tenei ao, Maku e ki atu He tangata, he tangata, he tangata.
A range of activities is planned, culminating in local communities weaving a section of a harakeke mat.
One of the activities well supported was each community weaving a section of a harakeke mat, with these sections picked up from around the country by a campaign bus and then woven together to represent a mat covering Maori health in Aotearoa New Zealand.
One of the key local community activities being promoted to highlight the pay parity issue is that each local community will weave a section of a harakeke blanket.
Huritea te rito o te harakeke Kei hea to kodmako e ko Ki mai ki ahau He aha te mea nui o tenei ao Maku e ki atu He tangata, he tangata, he tangata