Hapsburg


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Hapsburg,

Austrian royal family who ruled most of central and part of western Europe for centuries.
disease of the Hapsburgs - factor VIII deficiency causing blood coagulation disorder. Synonym(s): classic hemophilia; hemophilia A
References in periodicals archive ?
Kagan's study of the civil law process in Hapsburg Spain p resents an excellent discussion of the widespread corruption and excessive delays that characterized the handling of lawsuits in the Castilian judicial system.
The outstanding loyalty of the Croats to the Hapsburg Empire was undermined when the Hungarians started to try and turn the Croats into Magyars.
In my family they always talked about the Hapsburg debt.
Arcimboldo's youthful designs for tapestries and stained-glass windows are beautiful but one wonders if he would now be remembered had he remained in Milan, The Hapsburg court allowed Arcimboldo's talent to flower into genius.
What is clear from this history is that if members of the Nation were vulnerable inside the Hapsburg imperial community due to their "foreign" and religious status, so were the Hapsburgs as a result of their dependence on the Nation for credit and the provisioning of their colonies.
It was far too anarchic, too full of revolution, for a Hapsburg.
However, in 1526 the imperial Hapsburg dynasty inherited the kingdom and was again drawn into conflict when yet again the church fought for supremacy over the state.
Uncovered in an ancient mine in India, twice the size of its Hope Diamond cousin found at the same site, the Archduke Joseph eventually fell into the hands of Queen Victoria, Molina said, who gave it to Archduke Joseph August, a Hungarian prince of the Hapsburg dynasty (1872-1962).
A visit to the crypt, the official Hapsburg burial place, is not to be missed, if only for its macabre layout.
These small-scale motets with continuo (one, Giovanni Valentini's O vos omnes, is for five voices) stem largely from a single time and place: the Hapsburg court of Ferdinand II at Graz in the decade after 1615 - an environment Saunders has thoroughly explored in Cross, Sword, and Lyre: Sacred Music at the Imperial Court of Ferdinand II of Habsburg (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1995), to which this edition now functions as a companion musical volume.
This shocking event shook up the Hapsburg empire and gave rise, through novels and films, to endless romantic speculations as to the true nature of the double suicide.