Hand Transplantation

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The allografting of a hand from a cadaveric donor to a recipient who has lost same in an accident. They are technically demanding procedures which require 8-12 hours in contrast to heart transplants that require 6-8 hours. The procedure begins with the most structurally traumatic—bone fixation—followed by tendon fixation, and lastly arterial, nerve and venous anastomoses
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Dr Maneesh Singhal, HOD, burns and plastic at AIIMS told ANI: "Once the burns and plastic surgery block gets functional, we are hoping to conduct Face and Hand Transplant in Delhi.
The 43-year-old Lochwinnoch mum underwent double hand transplant surgery in January and has stunned medics with her speedy recovery, even learning to drive again.
Double hand transplant patient Corinne Hutton is motoring ahead so quickly with her recovery that she's just got back behind the wheel.
From having her hands and feet removed after a near fatal attack of pneumonia and sepsis to having a double hand transplant, it's like a movie script - one with a bit of horror, sadness, a shock twist and triumphant happy ending.
The first person in the UK to have a hand transplant was Mark Cahill, of Halifax, West Yorks, at Leeds General Infirmary in December 2012.
TANIA JACKSON, 42, from Hull, becomes the first woman in the UK to have a double hand transplant.
The UK's first hand transplant was carried out in 2013 when a surgical team at Leeds General Infirmary operated on 51-year-old former pub landlord Mark Cahill for eight hours to give him a transplanted donor hand.
c R o a b his other The carrie UK's first hand transplant was carried out in 2013 when a surgical team at Leeds General Infirmary operated on 51-year-old former pub landlord Mark Cahill for eight hours to give him a transplanted donor hand.
Physiologist Dr Robert Edwards and consultant gynaecologist Mr Patrick Steptoe during a 1978 press conference at Oldham General Hospital after the birth of the world's first test tube baby Louise Brown, right Hand transplant recipient Mark
Without an operation to remove the scar tissue, she would not have been able to remain on the hand transplant list.
The extended window also would allow tolerance building in recipients so they might need fewer harsh drugs to suppress their immune systems and prevent organ rejection, a major goal in the transplant community" - Dr Gerald Brandacher, a hand transplant expert (INSERT PHOTO, BOTTOM RIGHT)