Hall

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Hall

 [hawl]
Lydia E. (1906–1969) founder and first director of the Loeb Center for Nursing and Rehabilitation at Montefiore Hospital in the Bronx. Her work as a researcher and consultant at the New York Heart Association and as project director of nursing and long-term illnesses for the Division of Chronic Illnesses and Tuberculosis of the U.S. Public Health Service led her to believe that the nurse-patient relationship is therapeutic in itself and that the chief need of the chronically ill patient is professional nursing care. The establishment of the Loeb Center, providing professional nursing care in an institutional setting, enabled her to put her theories into practice.

Hall, Lydia E

(1906-1969), a nursing theorist who presented her Care, Core, and Cure Model in "Nursing: What Is It?" in The Canadian Nurse (1964). Hall believed that nursing functions differently in three overlapping circles that constitute aspects of patients. She labeled the circles the body (the care), the disease (the cure), and the person (the core). Hall viewed nursing in relation to the core aspect as concerned with the therapeutic use of self in communicating with the patient. Care is the nurturing, comforting component, the "hands-on" care of the patient. Cure is the aspect of nursing involved with treatments and administration of medications. Hall's concept includes adult patients who have passed the acute stage of illness and have rehabilitation and feelings of self-actualization as their goal.
References in classic literature ?
The guests had all filed through The Hall of Chiefs; the doors at both ends had been closed.
Some of it will do to patch up the Hall when I'm gone.
There was a flash of the great sword as the outlaw swung it to the full of his mighty strength through an arc that passed above the shoulders of Peter of Colfax, and the grinning head rolled upon the floor, while the loathsome carcass, that had been a baron of England, sunk in a disheveled heap among the rushes of the great hall of the castle of Leybourn.
Cabbages grew in plain sight; and a pumpkin-vine, rooted at some distance, had run across the intervening space, and deposited one of its gigantic products directly beneath the hall window, as if to warn the Governor that this great lump of vegetable gold was as rich an ornament as New England earth would offer him.
Since then Seryozha, having met him a second time in the hall, took great interest in him.
But in spite of all their grief and horror, when night came the thanes again lay down to rest in the great hall.
Each night, after Sierra Vista had gone to bed, she rose and let in White Fang to sleep in the big hall.
A soldier admitted them at the front entrance and his guide led him across the hall and into a large room on the other side of the house, an apartment which seemed to be half library, half morning-room.
Near the end, Hall and Billy went out of sight over the south side of the backbone, and when Saxon saw them again they were rounding the extreme point of rock and coming back on the cove side.
But you were very young when you last saw Baskerville Hall, were you not?
The hall of the association in Orchard street was fitted out with muscle- making inventions.
The populace thronged the avenues of the law courts in particular, because they knew that the Flemish ambassadors, who had arrived two days previously, intended to be present at the representation of the mystery, and at the election of the Pope of the Fools, which was also to take place in the grand hall.