Hallpike maneuver

Hallpike maneuver

Neurology A test used to evaluate vertigo–eg, benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, by observing nystagmus induced by positional changes

Hall·pike ma·neu·ver

(hawl'pīk mă-nū'vĕr)
Test for vertigo; positive result if rising from a sitting to a standing posture with head tilted to one side causes dizziness and nystagmus.

Hallpike maneuver

, Hallpike-Dix maneuver (hol'pik)
[Charles Skinner Hallpike, neurologist, 1900–1979]
A test performed to diagnose benign positional vertigo. The patient is moved from a sitting position to recumbency with the head tilted down over the end of the bed and turned toward either shoulder. If vertigo develops after a delay of several seconds, the test is subjectively positive. If vertigo is associated with visible nystagmus, it is objectively positive. Vertigo and nystagmus that occur immediately, rather than after a delay, are suggestive of intracranial, rather than labyrinthine, disease.
See: benign positional vertigo
References in periodicals archive ?
Findings on the Hallpike maneuver, the fistula test, and examination of the sinus, pharynx, and neck were also normal.
An absolute requirement for inclusion in this study was a positive nystagmus response to the Hallpike maneuver.
During followup visits, patients were evaluated subjectively by self-reports of symptom status and objectively by their response to the Hallpike maneuver.
Some clinics perform the Hallpike maneuver with ENG, although this might not be the best way to evaluate induced eye movements, because those movements can be rotary.