Hallpike maneuver

Hallpike maneuver

Neurology A test used to evaluate vertigo–eg, benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, by observing nystagmus induced by positional changes

Hall·pike ma·neu·ver

(hawl'pīk mă-nū'vĕr)
Test for vertigo; positive result if rising from a sitting to a standing posture with head tilted to one side causes dizziness and nystagmus.

Hallpike maneuver

, Hallpike-Dix maneuver (hol'pik)
[Charles Skinner Hallpike, neurologist, 1900–1979]
A test performed to diagnose benign positional vertigo. The patient is moved from a sitting position to recumbency with the head tilted down over the end of the bed and turned toward either shoulder. If vertigo develops after a delay of several seconds, the test is subjectively positive. If vertigo is associated with visible nystagmus, it is objectively positive. Vertigo and nystagmus that occur immediately, rather than after a delay, are suggestive of intracranial, rather than labyrinthine, disease.
See: benign positional vertigo
References in periodicals archive ?
Diagnosis was made primarily through history and by eliciting typical physical findings during Dix Hallpike maneuver. Pure Tone Audiometry (PTA) was normal in all the patients except for age related decreased hearing.
(4) Diagnosis is mainly by history and Dix Hallpike maneuver. Treatment is mainly supportive and Canalith repositioning maneuver (CRP) with or without vestibular sedatives.
Findings on the Hallpike maneuver, the fistula test, and examination of the sinus, pharynx, and neck were also normal.
The diagnosis is based on findings of typical positional rotatory nystagmus provoked by the head-hanging position (Hallpike maneuver) [2] and the observation of certain characteristic features, including a brief latency (usually 1 to 5 sec), limited duration (usually [greater than]30 sec), reversal on assuming an upright position, and a fatiguing of the response on repeat testing.
An absolute requirement for inclusion in this study was a positive nystagmus response to the Hallpike maneuver. Patients underwent a complete bedside vestibular test--including an oculomotor test, a positional and positioning test, a Romberg's test, and a tandem gait test--and most of them underwent audiography and electronystagmography.
The physician guided the patient backward into the provocative position (the Hallpike maneuver) with the diseased ear down.
During followup visits, patients were evaluated subjectively by self-reports of symptom status and objectively by their response to the Hallpike maneuver. They were also asked if they experienced any after-effects of therapy.
Some clinics perform the Hallpike maneuver with ENG, although this might not be the best way to evaluate induced eye movements, because those movements can be rotary.